Greenland Shark


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Greenland Shark

 

(Somniosus microcephalus), a fish of the suborder Selachoidei. The spindle-shaped body reaches a length of 6.5 m and weighs approximately 1 ton. The Greenland shark inhabits the northern Atlantic Ocean and adjacent regions of the Arctic Basin. In the summer it remains at depths to 1,000 m, and it rises to the surface in the winter. The shark feeds on fish and invertebrates. It reproduces in the spring, laying approximately 500 soft eggs having no horny capsule. The Greenland shark, which was at one time commercially important, is not harmful to humans.

References in periodicals archive ?
The researcher joined Dr Kit Kovacs and Dr Christian Lydersen from the Norwegian Polar Institute, to tag Greenland sharks in the waters off Svarlbard.
It was initially thought that Greenland sharks simply fed on the carcasses of dead seals on the seafloor, but the team recently discovered evidence that they were consuming live seals.
Vincent Gallucci, a shark expert from the University of Washington, US, explained that Greenland sharks may not need "to get 100 percent of its mouth onto its prey" in order to eat it.
Fishing The Greenland shark has been fished along the coasts of Norway, Iceland, and Greenland for its liver oil.
Somniosus microcephalus (Bloch and Schneider, 1801) Greenland shark Symnodon squamulosus (GLmther, 1877) Velvet dogfish S.
A Greenland shark from the wreck of the SS Central America at 2,200 meters.
Equipped with a large torpedo-shaped nose and a bloodhound-like sense of smell, a Greenland shark might be able to follow a seal's scent--right into the seal's tunnel in the ice.
So it's possible that an unsuspecting seal may be attacked by a hungry Greenland shark from below while the seal hides from polar bears above.
Could these movements be clues to how Greenland sharks hunt seals near the ice surface?
One of the factors that has threatened its survival is the fact that female Greenland sharks do not breed until around 100 years old and individuals are thought to live for more than 150 years.
Atlantic distribution of tag and recapture locations for the Greenland shark, Somniosus microcephalus, from the NMFS Cooperative Shark Tagging Program during 1962-93.
Total tagging distribution for the Greenland shark, Somniosus microcephalus, from the NMFS Cooperative Shark Tagging Program during 1962-93.