Grettir

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Grettir

Viking adventurer, outlawed for his ruthless slayings. [Icelandic Lit.: Grettir the Strong in Magill I, 335]
References in periodicals archive ?
Grettir's Last Stand and the Icelandic Frontier: Frank Norris's Retelling of the 13th-century Grettis Saga.
American author Frank Norris's 1890 short story, "Grettir at Drangey," overlooked by most readers and often elided from collections of his works, is a reworking of the 13th-century Icelandic Grettis Saga.
She used such diverse sagas as Njals saga, Grettis saga, and Olafs saga Tryggvasonar as examples of stranding, interlace composition, and bipartition.
Magnus Fjalldal reassesses with fierce scepticism the case for a relationship between Beowulf and Grettis saga -- texts which Fjalldal describes as `separated by several centuries in time and composed in different countries in different languages' -- in spite of the generally recognized parallels -- `so many, so obvious, and so detailed', according to one critic -- between the two.
As Fjalldal shows, some reconstructions of a hypothetical common origin text to Beowulf and Grettis saga have been over-literal, and the wilder theories of early critics do give one pause.
The first three chapters focus on Beowulf itself; the final three are devoted to the Liber monstrorum, the Alexander legend in Anglo-Saxon England, and the Old Norse Grettis saga.
Also, because we do not know when Beowulf was written, neither this comparison nor the later chapters on the Liber monstrorum and Grettis saga can throw much new light on Beowulf Orchard's failure to acknowledge this makes his book less focused than it could have been.
There is the same association between the grin and wordlessness in Grettis saga.