Grotius


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to Grotius: Pufendorf

Grotius

Hugo, original name Huig de Groot. 1583--1645, Dutch jurist and statesman, whose De Jure Belli ac Pacis (1625) is regarded as the foundation of modern international law
References in periodicals archive ?
304) Natural law, Grotius wrote, "deals not only with things made by nature herself, but with things produced by the act of man.
This rule of vicarious liability, Grotius argued, "is the outgrowth of a certain necessity, because otherwise a great licen[s]e to cause injury would arise; the reason is that in many cases the goods of rulers cannot so easily be seized as those of private persons, who are more numerous.
Before concluding discussion on this topic, it is worth noting that Grotius generally opposed Gentili's views in early international legal theory.
70] Grotius argued that husbands who abused their rights of legal guardianship by treating their wives with cruelty should be brought to court.
So, for instance, instead of treating the case for anticipatory war against Iraq directly, a number of just war theorists have over the past decade indulged in vigorous debates about the finer points of the right to preemption as intimated by such figures as Aquinas and Grotius.
The Dutch theologian Grotius speaks to proportionality arguing, "When punishment is lawful and just, all the means absolutely necessary to enforce its execution are also lawful and just, and every act that forms part of the punishment, such as destroying an enemy's property and country by fire or any other way, falls within the limits of justice proportionable to the offence.
A historical demonstration that someone (Hugo Grotius, for example) thought it valid everywhere and always does not mean it actually is.
In an essay that, like Turner's, shows the importance of the divorce tracts as part of Milton's toleration work, Rosenblatt investigates the ways in which Milton's ideas derive from his knowledge of natural law theorists, particularly Hugo Grotius and John Selden (132).
In the present volume, Grotius and Pufendorf become the main philosophical inspirations for devising a moral ground for the rules of warfare as the basis for the legal frameworks that define international criminal and humanitarian law.
The first explores historical developments in theological politics including insightful essays on John's Book of Revelation, Augustine, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Ockham, Wycliff, Erasmus, Luther, and Grotius.
Hugo Grotius and Jacob Arminius are more familiar figures who make an appearance here, and so is Roger Williams, the Cambridge-trained nonconformist who is best known for his role in placing the colony of Rhode Island on a foundation of religious liberty.
Grotius emphasized that law must be distinguished from wider ethical notions about honor or moral desert.