epiphyseal plate

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epiphyseal plate

[ə¦pif·ə¦sē·əl ′plāt]
(anatomy)
The broad, articular surface on each end of a vertebral centrum.
The thin layer of cartilage between the epiphysis and the shaft of a long bone. Also known as metaphysis.
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They grow in close proximity to the growth plate cartilages and are therefore thought to result from abnormal regulation of proliferation and terminal differentiation of chondrocytes.
Transphyseal vessels bridging the growth plate to the epiphysis were identified as well.
So an understanding of how to design products so they don't invade the growth plate is key to developing a successful pediatric implant.
Histologic changes of the growth plate in patients with Blount's disease suggest a delay in cartilage ossification in the medial metaphysis and epiphysis, which causes varus deformity if growth in the lateral aspect of the growth plate continues.
Final closure of the growth plates, with injury stresses then concentrated on the joint.
Specializations of the growth plate are the prime mechanisms that animals evolved so they could grow fast, and accompanying rapid growth is homeothermy--being warm-blooded.
Micheli says frequent shocks to the growth plate of the wrist can cause the two bones in the forearm to grow unevenly.
Aside from creating imbalances that could result in ankle sprains, continuous running in a cleated shoe can injure and inflame the growth plate in the heel, causing a painful condition called Calcaneal Apophysitis, which can be extremely slow to heal and, in extreme cases, may require surgical intervention.
Children's bones will not have fully calcified and will still have an area of tissue known as the growth plate.
But fractures in both feet due to growth plate problems put him in a wheelchair and out of action for a year.
With an adult, [high] heels that don't fit properly can lead to hammer toes or bunions, but an adult's growth plate is closed.
Growth plate injuries are also common in children and adolescents.