growth rate

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Related to Growth rates: Economic Growth Rates, GDP Growth Rates

growth rate

[′grōth ‚rāt]
(microbiology)
Increase in the number of bacteria in a population per unit time.

growth rate

Rate of wood growth expressed as the number of annual rings per inch measured from pith to bark; sometimes used to rate soft-woods for strength.
References in periodicals archive ?
2, we measure the sectoral MFP growth rates using the dual approach described in Byrne et al.
It can be see that some of the interesting findings from the Table-2; the growth rates in the state domestic product for the period 1982-83 to 1990-91 are lesser than the growth rates for the period 1990-91 to 2004-05.
Chemical industry accelerated its growth rates from 20% to 57% in 2000-2005, then slowed down the rates by 34% in 2009,
Based on seasonally and working day adjusted data, GDP growth rate in real terms is estimated at -1.
Table 7 presents the differences in growth rates for the Nation and New York City and a decomposition of those differences for the entire 1990-2008 period and three subperiods.
Despite the growth rate of NR output having increased while that of consumption has declined, the global NR deficit remains, but is much smaller than at the end of last year.
5% sales growth rate scenarios are unlikely to occur and are cluttering your report, click on the pull-down arrow in cell A4, select those scenarios and click on OK to remove them.
For example, when the very low growth rate for 2003 was put in the EU Commission model for the German potential growth rate, the estimate of the output gap had to be revised downward substantially, with the consequence that the estimate of the cyclically adjusted deficit increased by almost 0.
The largest drops in GDP growth rates are expected in Japan (from 4.
Also, the intention of this study is to present crucial policy directions to enhance the potential growth rate through identifying factors that will influence the future economy.
But, unfortunately, evidence from both the United States and other countries shows that more school resources and smaller classes do not have much of an effect on how much a student learns in school, as measured by tests of achievement, The international math and science scores so important for growth rates are not related to variations in spending on education or other standard measures of school resources, such as pupil-teacher ratios.
During the '90s, they had their best growth rates since the 1960s.