Guaiacum


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Related to Guaiacum: Guaiacum sanctum

Guaiacum

 

a genus of evergreen trees of the bean-caper family (Zygophyllaceae). There are six species in tropical America. The trees are tall, with paripinnate leaves, and hard, heavy wood (density, 1.17-1.3 g/cm3), which is used in machine building. The most valuable timber for industrial purposes comes from G. sanctum and G. officinale. (Guaiacum is obtained from the latter.)


Guaiacum

 

contained in the wood (about 22 percent) of the heart of the guaiac tree (lignum vitae; Guaiacum officinale). Guaiacum is obtained by the dry distillation or boiling of the pounded wood. The gum is reddish brown, dissolves in alcohol, acetone, ether, and alkali, and melts at 85° C. It has a density of 1.2 g/cm3. An alcohol solution of guaiacum turns green or blue when oxidized and is used as a hemoglobin reagent.

References in periodicals archive ?
Given the challenges of working Guaiacum, and to ensure the efficiency of the stone and shell tools, it is probable that the wood was carved green (fresh), when it was comparatively softer and easier to work, rather than when it dried to iron- like hardness.
So the first few weeks of a typical Lyme disease protocol might involve patients taking Diflucan and/or Nystatin, along with smilax and transfer factor the first week, adding teasel to the protocol the second week, and then adding samento or guaiacum, or my herbal Lyme formula, the third week.
Eighty-five percent of 117 nests on Margarita Island were in Bulnesia arborea and only 3% were in Guaiacum officinale (Sanz 2004).
1525), along with his medical text on relieving the morbus gallicus with guaiacum wood, El modo de adoperare el legno de India, published in 1529 (485).
Top notes are cologne-like citrus, middle notes are olive flower and aniseed and base notes are tobacco, fine leather and a rare South American tree called guaiacum, which has deep warm and soothing qualities.
Saxena, a plant physiologist at the University of Guelph in Ontario, is working with Costa Rican scientists to find a trick for culturing their native Guaiacum sanctum.