Guanches


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Guanches

 

the ancient population of the Canary Islands. By the time of the discovery and conquest of the islands by the Spaniards (1402–94), the Guanche population had reached 20,000. They spoke a language close to the Berber languages. According to a great deal of data, the origin of the Guanches was also related to North Africa. They engaged in farming and livestock raising and used tools made of stone and wood. After the Spanish conquest, some of the Guanches were exterminated, others were sent into slavery, and the rest became mixed with the Spanish colonists and lost their language.

References in periodicals archive ?
It was a last place of refuge for the Guanches, the island's original inhabitants, before they were wiped out by the invading Spanish conquistadors.
In recycling Antiguedades for the stage, the author maintains, Lope de Vega dresses its marriage-bound itinerary in Neoplatonic garb; yet he works to undo Viana's fanciful merger of identities, freighting Los Guanches de Tenerife y conquista de Canaria (1618) with insinuations about invaders who require help from the Virgin to effect peaceful conversions, and with overt criticism of greedy gold-worshiping conquistadors, who emerge as the play's "true idolaters" (155).
The original inhabitants of Tenerife were the Guanches, thought to be descended from Berber tribes in North Africa.
In it, they make some major discoveries linking the Guanches - a cave-dwelling, goat-herding people from the Canary Islands, who mummified their dead - with ancient peoples of Africa and Egypt.
When Spanish adventurers first set foot in the Canary Islands in the mid-14th century they were shocked to discover the Guanches - a cave dwelling, goat herding people who mummified their dead.
The archaeology of their indigenous people, the Guanches, is caught up now in the contemporary politics of the Islas Canarias.
In 1483, this was the last place of refuge for the Guanches, the island's original inhabitants before they were wiped out by the invading Spanish conquistadors.
Over the next few hours, I gazed in awe at pinnacles such as the 5,914ft Roque Nueblo (Rock in the Cloud), and the amazing 4,632 ft Roque Bentayga - a last place of refuge for the Guanches, the island's original inhabitants, before they were wiped out by the invading Spanish conquistadors.
It took around three years for the invaders to take the island and then only after most of the tough Guanches had been killed off by flu and other diseases which the Spaniards had brought with them.
Comedia la famosa de Los guanches de Tenerife y conquista de Canaria.
In 1483 this was the last place of refuge for the Guanches, the island's original inhabitants before they were wiped out by the invading Spanish conquistadors.
Not that the Guanches have disappeared: many in Gran Canaria's interior will courteously remind you that they are Canarians of African stock -related to the Berbers -rather than Spaniards.