Guaporé

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Guaporé

(gwəpo͝orĕ`), river, c.750 mi (1,207 km) long, rising in the mountains of Mato Grosso state, W Brazil. It flows northwest through rain forest and forms part of the Brazil-Bolivia border before joining the Mamoré River. The river is also called Iténez. Guaporé was the original name (until 1956) of the Brazilian federal territory that is now the state of RondôniaRondônia
, state (1996 pop. 1,132,692), 93,839 sq mi (243,043 sq km), NW Brazil, on the border with Bolivia. Pôrto Velho is the capital. Rain forests still cover much of the state, although by the 1980s deforestation had begun to emerge as a serious environmental
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Guaporé

 

a river in South America, right-bank tributary of the Mamoré (Amazon Basin). Length, 1,550 km; basin area, about 310,000 sq km. It rises on the southern slopes of the Serra dos Parecis mountains, in the western part of the Brazilian Highlands. In its upper course it flows through the plateau of Mato Grosso in Brazil; the rest of it traverses marshy lowland and serves as the border between Brazil and Bolivia. Its most important left-bank affluents are the Paraguá, Baures, and Itonamas. It is fed by rainwater; its waters rise highest (up to 8 m at its mouth) in the period from February through April. The Guaporé is navigable from the city of Mato Grosso to its mouth.

References in periodicals archive ?
The nearest previous record of Gray Monjita to the BX-044 polygon is from the Guapore River Valley in the cerrado--rainforest ecotone >700 km to the south (Silveira and D'Horta 2002).
The nearest confirmed records of White-rumped Monjita to the BX-044 polygon are from the Guapore River Valley (State of Mato Grosso) in the cerrado-rainforest ecotone >700 km to the south (Silveira and D'Horta 2002).
Brochado (Brochado & Lathrap 1980; Brochado 1984) concluded that the Guarani pottery in the Guarita tradition lost decorative techniques- modelling, excision and incision in fine and long lines - during the southward expansions outside Amazonia, through the Madeira and Guapore rivers.