Guarino da Verona


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Guarino da Verona

(gwärē`nō dä vārô`nä), 1374?–1460, Italian humanist, considered the greatest teacher of his time. Associated with several universities, he translated various Greek and Latin classics and wrote a Latin grammar (1487).
References in periodicals archive ?
Guarino da Verona fra letterati e cortigiani a Ferrara (1429-1460).
1) Court humanists dedicated Latin ekphrases and Italian verse to Pisanello's art, starting with Guarino da Verona in 1427, followed by Ulisse degli Aleotti, Angelo Galli, Tito Vespasiano Strozzi, Basinio da Parma, Leonardo Dati and Porcellio.
Like many expert wordsmiths, Guarino da Verona had little respect for visual representations that were unaccompanied by words, sine litteris (imaginatively translated by Baxandall as "unlabeled"); he must have been delighted with Matteo de' Pasti's superb medal that connected his name for all time to his highly idiosyncratic features.
It also permitted the equation of Guarino da Verona to Aristotle, a reference that the humanist could not possibly have overlooked.
His early translators included Guarino da Verona, Giovanni Aurispa, Leon Battista Alberti, Lapo da Castiglionchio, Rinucci da Castiglione, Poggio Bracciolini and Lilius Tifernas (chapter 1).
Leonello d'Este, patron of Guarino da Verona (1371-1460) and Ferrarese prince, had been in Florence when Poggio penned his response.
The first translation of the entire Geography into Latin was accomplished in the 1450s when, on commission from Pope Nicholas V, Guarino da Verona worked periodically on this monumental project which he first dedicated to Nicholas.
66) In the dedication of the first printed edition (1469) of Strabo's Geography in Rome, its printer, Giovanni Antonio Bussi, praised the great Greek geographers of the past, expressing his gratitude to the popes who had foreseen the necessity to translate the works of Ptolemy and Strabo in assigning their translations to Jacopo d'Angelo and Guarino da Verona respectively.
There is hardly an undergraduate course or textbook that does not point to Vittorino da Feltre and Guarino da Verona as teachers whose small but highly influential schools taught the children of the elite alongside those of the merchant class, enrolled girls alongside boys, presented the ancient classics alongside the moderns, and encouraged physical alongside intellectual well-being.
Panormita's best known work, the Hermaphroditus, a corpus of eighty-one witty and often obscene Latin epigrams modeled on Martial and the Priapea, earned him fame and praise by, among others, Guarino da Verona, who called Panormita the poetic scion of another renowned Sicilian, Theocritus.
The final work of Panormita to be considered here dates to sometime after 1435,(41) the year when, significantly, Panormita's former champion Guarino da Verona withdrew his support for the poet in a letter to Giovanni Lamola.
26 Such puritanism is addressed by the renowned humanist scholar Guarino da Verona in a letter to Giovanni Lamola (1426), in L'Hermaphrodite de Panormita, xiii-xiv, after the latter had sent Guarino a copy of the Hermaphroditus.