guava

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guava

(gwä`və), small evergreen tree or shrub of the genus Psidium of the family Myrtaceae (myrtlemyrtle,
common name for the Myrtaceae, a family of shrubs and trees almost entirely of tropical regions, especially in America and Australia. The family is characterized by leaves (usually evergreen) containing aromatic volatile oils. Many have showy blossoms.
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 family), native to tropical America and grown elsewhere for its ornamental flowers and edible fruit. The fruit (a fleshy berry with many hard seeds) of the common tropical guava (P. guajava) is shaped like an apple or a pear and has white, pink, or red flesh (depending on the variety) with a sweet, musky flavor and, usually, a yellow rind. The strawberry guava (P. cattleyanum), native to Brazil, bears a red fruit with a rough rind and reddish pulp, supposedly strawberrylike in flavor. At the time of the Spanish explorations the guava was found from Peru to Mexico; in the United States it is now grown commercially in Florida and California, where it has also escaped cultivation and become naturalized. Much of the perishable fruit is made into jellies, beverages, and similar products. It is a rich source of minerals and of vitamins A and C. Guava is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Myrtales, family Myrtaceae.

Guava

 

(Psidium guajava), an evergreen tree of the family Myrtaceae, usually 4–5 m tall (sometimes up to 10 m). It grows wild in tropical America and is grown in all tropical countries. The sour-sweet, aromatic, juicy fruit of the guava has great nutritional value, containing up to 11 percent sugar, about 0.7 percent fat, and about 0.7 percent protein. There are many cultivated varieties of guava. In the USSR there are guava trees in planting collections along the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus.

REFERENCE

Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.

guava

[′gwäv·ə]
(botany)
Psidium guajava. A shrub or low tree of tropical America belonging to the family Myrtaceae; produces an edible, aromatic, sweet, juicy berry.

guava

1. any of various tropical American trees of the myrtaceous genus Psidium, esp P. guajava, grown in tropical regions for their edible fruit
2. the fruit of such a tree, having yellow skin and pink pulp: used to make jellies, jams, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I started purchasing these guavas as they are tastier than the normal ones.
Among the genotypes was observed that, in average, Cortibel 4 and Cortibel 6 guavas had the least number of buds when compared to the AU cattley guava, that, even not differing from the other genotypes concerning this characteristic, considering the average of two pruning seasons.
Guava fruit is used mostly for squashes pickles and juices which are leading to cottage industry.
Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to investigate the effects of enzyme concentration (500-900 ppm) and incubation time (30-90 min) on viscosity of guava puree and pH, titratable acidity, clarity, yield, total soluble solid (TSS) and ascorbic acid of guava juice.
Worldwide Pakistan is the 2nd largest producer of guava after India (Jagtiani et al.
While he can't even begin to calculate the income potential of such products as guava extract pills, he says there's definitely a lot more to be squeezed out of guavas than just puree.
I) use pineapple guava chutney with pork loin roast instead of gravy, it's really good,'' she said.
You'll get more out of guava or grapefruit than applesauce or canned pears.
Food processors can extract a clear juice from guavas using natural enzymes, says ARS food technologist Harvey T.
Pineapple guava and strawberry guava are two related but distincly different plants--and April's a good time to plant either one.
According to scientists from India's National Institute in Hyderabad, the Indian plum, the custard apple and India's beloved mangoes, come after guavas in antioxidant richness.
Brazil is the world's largest guava producer, and more than 50% of its total guava cultivated area is in the northeastern region, mainly in the states of Pernambuco and Bahia (MAPA, 2002; LIMA et al.