guava

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guava

(gwä`və), small evergreen tree or shrub of the genus Psidium of the family Myrtaceae (myrtlemyrtle,
common name for the Myrtaceae, a family of shrubs and trees almost entirely of tropical regions, especially in America and Australia. The family is characterized by leaves (usually evergreen) containing aromatic volatile oils. Many have showy blossoms.
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 family), native to tropical America and grown elsewhere for its ornamental flowers and edible fruit. The fruit (a fleshy berry with many hard seeds) of the common tropical guava (P. guajava) is shaped like an apple or a pear and has white, pink, or red flesh (depending on the variety) with a sweet, musky flavor and, usually, a yellow rind. The strawberry guava (P. cattleyanum), native to Brazil, bears a red fruit with a rough rind and reddish pulp, supposedly strawberrylike in flavor. At the time of the Spanish explorations the guava was found from Peru to Mexico; in the United States it is now grown commercially in Florida and California, where it has also escaped cultivation and become naturalized. Much of the perishable fruit is made into jellies, beverages, and similar products. It is a rich source of minerals and of vitamins A and C. Guava is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Myrtales, family Myrtaceae.

Guava

 

(Psidium guajava), an evergreen tree of the family Myrtaceae, usually 4–5 m tall (sometimes up to 10 m). It grows wild in tropical America and is grown in all tropical countries. The sour-sweet, aromatic, juicy fruit of the guava has great nutritional value, containing up to 11 percent sugar, about 0.7 percent fat, and about 0.7 percent protein. There are many cultivated varieties of guava. In the USSR there are guava trees in planting collections along the Black Sea coast of the Caucasus.

REFERENCE

Siniagin, I. I. Tropicheskoe zemledelie. Moscow, 1968.

guava

[′gwäv·ə]
(botany)
Psidium guajava. A shrub or low tree of tropical America belonging to the family Myrtaceae; produces an edible, aromatic, sweet, juicy berry.

guava

1. any of various tropical American trees of the myrtaceous genus Psidium, esp P. guajava, grown in tropical regions for their edible fruit
2. the fruit of such a tree, having yellow skin and pink pulp: used to make jellies, jams, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A guava a day keeps a doctor away," the Telegraph quoted Dr Sreeramulu as saying.
Although some of the nation's largest beverage companies have inquired about the clarified guava juice, they have yet to add it to their products, Chan says.
When you list guava on a product label," Chan notes, "you're adding the appeal of both an exotic tropical fruit and an all-natural ingredient.
Strawberry guava has leathery, glossy green leaves and a naturally graceful form similar to that of sasanqua camellias.
The production of red guavas is also very good this year.
20 (ANI): Guava production has gone up in Allahabad due to the timely arrival of winter.
Ramesh Yadav, a guava orchard owner, said the good quality of soil is the reason for the unique-tasting high quality fruit.
Guava farmers earn profits of approximately 300-400 rupees per day.
So they are planning to cut their orchards and grow guavas, or even wheat, which also gets good money in the market, " said Vijyendra Kumar, a mango grower.
Also mango crop is more susceptible to pest attacks, whereas diseases do not infect guavas easily.
As against mango that gives yield once a year, the growers get better money from cultivating guavas, which yields fruit twice a year.
Malihabad (UP), May 23 (ANI): Poor production of mango has forced the mango growers in Malihabad region to take up guava cultivation.