lignum vitae

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lignum vitae

(lĭg`nəm vī`tē) [Lat.,=wood of life], tropical American evergreen tree of the genus Guaiacum. The hard, dense, and extremely durable wood, obtained chiefly from G. officinale and G. sanctum, is used for ship construction, butcher blocks, and other articles requiring strength and hardness. The trees are cultivated to some extent in Florida and California for ornament. They also yield guaiacum, a gum resinresin,
any of a class of amorphous solids or semisolids. Resins are found in nature and are chiefly of vegetable origin. They are typically light yellow to dark brown in color; tasteless; odorless or faintly aromatic; translucent or transparent; brittle, fracturing like glass;
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 used in certain drugs. Various other hardwoods of Australasia (e.g., the acacia and eucalyptus) are also called lignum vitae. Lignum vitae is classified in several orders in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Zygophyllaceae.

lignum vitae

1. either of two zygophyllaceous tropical American trees, Guaiacum officinale or G. sanctum, having blue or purple flowers
2. the heavy resinous wood of either of these trees, which is used in machine bearings, casters, etc.: formerly thought to have medicinal properties
References in periodicals archive ?
Common subdominants are prickly pear, Spanish dagger, guajillo, guayacan, mountain laurel, lotebush, allthorn (Koeberlinia spinosa), Texas kidneywood, Texas ebony, mesquite, and cenizo.
Prickly pear and guayacan are important subdominants within this community.
Green fruits were observed on guayacan, Texas huisache, and Texas paloverde.
These included Texas sugarberry, guayacan, granjeno, chilipiquin, tepeguaje, Texas ebony, Wright's acacia, colima, blackbrush, cenizo, honey mesquite, Texas persimmon, elbow bush, brasil, black mimosa, Texas paloverde, snake-eyes (Phaulothamnus spinescens), and desert yaupon (Schaefferia cuneifolia).
African-Colombians and Waunanas in the near-by village of Guayacan, lower Calima River, described the burial practices which included 2-m shaft-graves with chambers; a better knowledge of style - similar to late pre-hispanic tombs at Cupica (Linne 1929) - contributes to determining the antiquity of Waunana culture.
The dominant understory species were honey mesquite, granjeno (Celtis pallida), brasil (Condalia hookeri), mist flower (Eupatorium odoratum), huisache, coma (Bumelia celastrina), ivy treebine (Cissus incisa), snakeeyes (Phaulothamnus spinescens), coyotillo (Karwinskia humboldtiana), and guayacan (Guaiacum angustifolium).
Several of the understory brush species in plots 4, 5, and 6, such as brasil, coma, snake-eyes, coyotillo, guayacan, elbowbush, Berlandier wolfberry, and Texas ebony, are thought to be 'mature' woodland species because they are common on the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, which has remained undisturbed for more than 40 years, but former disclimax (flooding) or climax species are unknown.
Further regional work is also underway with emphasis on the Guayacan gold/copper porphyry system located approximately four kilometres south of the El Sauzal mine.
Before joining SBA, Guzman-Fournier worked in the Global Corporate and Investment Bank of Citigroup in New York and with Grupo Guayacan, Inc.
The Forum was established by a group of high-level business and academic leaders and Grupo Guayacan, Inc.
Previously worked veins at Guayacan averaged 7 g Au/t and 3,000 g Ag/t, while at Arrieros breccia bodies are reported to yield up to 4 g Au/t.