Gudi Padva

Gudi Padva

March-April; first day of the waxing half of the Hindu month of Caitra
Gudi Padva marks the beginning of the civil year among Hindus, particularly in the states of Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, and Karnataka in central India. The actual New Year ( see Vaisakh), which begins on the first day of Vaisakha (April-May) is not the same as the beginning of the civil year, which begins on the new moon day of the preceding month, Caitra.
Hindus observe this day by erecting a pole from which hangs a silk banner (a gudi ) or a piece of women's clothing and a drinking pot. This pole is displayed by sticking it out a window or tying it to the roof or a nearby tree. There are a number of legends associated with the pole, but it generally serves as a good luck symbol.
Other customs associated with this day are visiting friends, bathing, and eating leaves from the nim tree, which is believed to bring protection against illness, since this tree has a holy connection with Sitala, the smallpox goddess.
SOURCES:
CelebFestIndia-1994, p. 45
HinduRelYr-1921, p. 42
RelHolCal-2004, p. 184
(c)
References in periodicals archive ?
It is going to be a colourful evening to mark the Indian festive season from January to April, comprising Baisakhi, Vishu, Bihu, Ugadi, Nowroz, Gudi Padva, Chetichand, Tamil New Year, Bengali New Year, Al Hijri New Year and many more.
Meanwhile, people in Maharashtra are celebrating the festival of Gudi Padva with their own traditional fervour of buying gold.
The festival is a joint celebration that is being held to mark the New Year festivities in different Indian states such as Baisakhi in Punjab, Vishu in Kerala, Bihu in Assam, Gudi Padva in Andhra Pradesh, Chetichand, Novroz, Ugadi, Bengali New Year, Tamil New Year and other similar celebrations that generally herald the advent of spring and a good harvest.