Guy of Warwick

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Guy of Warwick

(wŏr`ĭk), English legendary hero, popularized by an anonymous 14th-century rhymed romance. Guy won the earl of Warwick's daughter and saved England from the Danes by killing the giant Colbrand; he later renounced worldly vanities and ended his days as a hermit. The story probably has a historical basis. Its popularity lasted through the 17th and 18th cent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ivana Djordjevics "Saracens and Other Saxons: Using, Misusing, and Confusing Names in Gui de Warewic and Guy of Warwick" tackles a different kind of promiscuity in romance, the loose use of geography.
Appearing first in the early thirteenth-century Anglo-Norman text Gui de Warewic, Guy retained his appeal through English rewritings well into the seventeenth century.
The question of the popularity of Guy of Warwick and its original Gui de Warewic bears upon the literary quality of the texts, given that, traditionally, to describe a romance text as "popular" implied being "of low status, artless, undemanding and unsophisticated" (intro.
The curious introduction of Samson has precedent in the majority of the surviving Anglo-Norman copies of Gui de Warewic - but in the case of the second prayer only.
7 'Sire, qui resuscitas Lazarun | E del leun guaris Sansun', Gui de Warewic, ed.
6), where a reference to St Peter's church misleads Manning into thinking of Peterborough; the romaunce de Gwy referred to on page 136 may possibly be only half of the title of some poem other than Gui de Warewic (Blaess suggests a different identity); and while no doubt 'a friar needed to eat' (191), I suspect that one who depended for food on La Venerie de Twiti would go hungry.