Guido Guinizelli

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Guinizelli, Guido

 

Born between 1230 and 1240 in Bologna; died 1276 in Monselice. Italian poet. The father of dolce stil nuovo poetry.

In his doctrinaire canzone “Love Always Reigns in the Noble Heart,” Guinizelli glorified love as a feeling that ennobles the soul no less than the love of God. He maintained that nobility in man does not depend on his social origin. Such an exaltation of man makes Guinizelli a harbinger of the Renaissance and a direct forerunner of Dante, who called him his “father” in the art of love poetry. Guinizelli’s poetry also contains motifs of sensual passion (the sonnet “Lucia in the Colorful Cape”).

WORKS

In T. Casini, Le rime del poeti bolognesi del secolo XIII. Bologna, 1881.

REFERENCES

De Sanctis, F. Istoriia ital’ianskoi literatury, vol. 1. Milan, 1963. (Translated from Italian.)
Russo, L. Storia della letteratura italiana, vol. 1. Florence [1957].

N. G. ELINA

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Guido Guinizzelli and, generations later, Cino da Pistoia both endured exile and hence estrangement from their possessions as sources of wealth and power; Guido Cavalcanti was not actually noble at all; and, as Forese Donati repeatedly acknowledges in his sonnets, the Alighieri conducted themselves in distinctly un-aristocratic fashions.
After a brief introduction, the first chapter is dedicated to the investigation of the patristic antecedents of the misogynistic attitude responsible for the efflorescence of the poetic cliche of female unattractiveness in the so-called comic-realistic poetry of Rustico Filippi and Guido Guinizzelli in the thirteenth century.
After an introductory section on its philosophical and metaphysical conception, there are sections on Guido Guinizzelli, Guido Cavalcanti, Dante, and Cino da Pistoia.
Guido Guinizzelli, for instance, says of his mistress that "infra l'altre par lucente sole," and Guido Cavalcanti encounters a shepherdess who is "piu che la stella--bella," both echoing Wisdom 7:29, quoted above.