Guillaume de Lorris


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Lorris, Guillaume de:

see Guillaume de LorrisGuillaume de Lorris
, c.1215–c.1278, French poet, author of the first part of the Roman de la Rose. He handled the chivalric conventions with subtlety and charm, and his work shows taste, psychological perception, and wide familiarity with French letters.
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Guillaume de Lorris

(gēyōm` də lôrēs`), c.1215–c.1278, French poet, author of the first part of the Roman de la RoseRoman de la Rose, Le
, French poem of 22,000 lines in eight-syllable couplets. It is in two parts. The first (4,058 lines) was written (c.1237) by Guillaume de Lorris and was left unfinished. It is an elaborate allegory on the psychology of love, often subtle and charming.
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. He handled the chivalric conventions with subtlety and charm, and his work shows taste, psychological perception, and wide familiarity with French letters.

Guillaume de Lorris

13th century, French poet who wrote the first 4058 lines of the allegorical romance, the Roman de la rose, continued by Jean de Meung
References in classic literature ?
Chaucer experimented with the numerous lyric forms which the French poets had brought to perfection; he also translated, in whole or in part, the most important of medieval French narrative poems, the thirteenth century 'Romance of the Rose' of Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meung, a very clever satirical allegory, in many thousand lines, of medieval love and medieval religion.
looks forward to works" by Dante, Chaucer, and Guillaume de Lorris (176).
The trick that Jean de Meun plays occurs in the mid-point of the conjoined text: in a speech by Amor, the Lover, Amant, is suddenly named as Guillaume de Lorris.
As Guillaume de Lorris noted years before Marian poetry was in vogue and Sceve wrote his Delie, when "la rose entre espines fleurit," it is alw ays the poet whose heart is pricked:
Etudes sur le Roman de la Rose de Guillaume de Lorris.
Guillaume de Lorris et Jean de Meun, Le Roman de la Rose 273-93.
39 Guillaume de Lorris, Roman de la rose lines 2165-68; trans.
See also the exhalation of sweet perfume in Guillaume de Lorris, Roman de la rose lines 2643-44.
Where Guillaume de Lorris had left a careful, ironic veil of ambiguity over his lover's oath and his lover's loyalties, Machaut, less subtly, conflates lady and love (is it a coincidence that Amour, in the Remede, is feminine?
I drew a distinction above between two varieties of female authority in the Rose: those of Raison and Nature, who as allegorical figures are endorsed by tradition (and by their creators Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun), and the `real' woman, La Vieille, who may position herself as a mestres (RR, 13475), but whose mastery is disallowed by her virulent vindictiveness as well as by her gender(69) La Vieille's long speech, we remember, is addressed to Bel Acueil -- who is male and therefore consistently addressed with such phrases as beau filz; on the other hand, of course, as an avatar or `component' of the Rose, he represents the female.
Guillaume de Lorris et Jean de Meun, Le Roman de la Rose, edition d'apres les manuscrits BN 12786 et BN 378, traduction, presentation et notes par Armand Strubel, Lettres Gothiques (Paris: Livre de Poche, 1992).
Guillaume de Lorris develops the procedure still further by conflating the first-person speaker and the narrated subject.