Gujarati

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Gujarati

(go͝o'jərä`tē), language belonging to the Indic group of the Indo-Iranian subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. See Indo-IranianIndo-Iranian,
subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages, spoken by more than a billion people, chiefly in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka (see The Indo-European Family of Languages, table).
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 languages.

Gujarati

, Gujerati
the state language of Gujarat, belonging to the Indic branch of the Indo-European family
References in periodicals archive ?
Barbara Patel, who received campaign mail as her surname appeared to be Gujerati, said 'I am not a Hindu or Gujerati.
Warwickshire County Council translated a document called "Weight Busters" into Panjabi, Gujerati and Urdu for pounds 207 and "Business Card" into Chinese for pounds 30.
He was denounced at the court of Aceh by the Malay-speaking Gujerati scholar Nuruddin Ar-Raniri (d.
We have handpicked some of the finest chefs from India's famous Taj Group and we can provide Gujerati, South Indian, Oriental, Indo Fusion, European and other cuisine.
Interviews were conducted in Gujerati (my mother tongue) and English, according to the preference of the women.
Along, right-side,' the shopman directed them in Gujerati English.
I have to admit my Lithuanian, Polish, Gujerati, Rumanian and Serbo-Croat aren't too good, either, but the occasional visitor to London like me cannot help but be staggered by the way in which immigrants have taken over our service industries.
He could, of course, been speaking Gujerati, but I replied politely: "I do not have beriberi, lassa fever, alopaecia, green monkey disease, wi-fi or any dubious conditions of the inner thigh.
This trait is often forgotten, because Gujerati businessmen like all businessmen, generally accept and accommodate in the interest of their business pursuits.
Indigenous Europeans, in short, in a few compressed years have had to confront in their midst people speaking among themselves Bengali, Urdu, Seraike, Pushtu, Gujerati, Turkish, and many other languages, further set apart by clothing, food, and cultural and social habits, and finally by faith as asserted through the mosques so visible in the landscape and so different in architecture to their settings.
But the deal will not be completed until the details have been translated into Gujerati so that the family's 77-year-old matriarch, Shantagaury Pathak, can agree to it.
Walk along the wide boulevards of the capital, Tunis, and you encounter a bewildering array of languages -- French, English, German, Spanish, Swedish mix and mingle with Wolof, Hausa, Yoruba, Swahili, Zulu, Ndebele and Afrikaans; listen carefully and you can pick up Gujerati, Urdu, Tamil, Malay, Chinese and the unmistakable drawl of American.