Gulf


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Gulf.

For names of bodies of water beginning thus, see second part; e.g., for Gulf of Mexico, see Mexico, Gulf ofMexico, Gulf of,
arm of the Atlantic Ocean, c.700,000 sq mi (1,813,000 sq km), SE North America. The Gulf stretches more than 1,100 mi (1,770 km) from west to east and c.800 mi (1,290 km) from north to south.
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Gulf

 

bay, a part of an ocean, sea, or lake that extends inland but has a free exchange of water with the main body of water.

The hydrologic and hydrochemical conditions of a gulf (bay) are identical to the conditions of the body of water of which it is a part. In isolated cases local peculiarities of climate and continental flow can give to the hydrologic characteristics of the surface layer of a gulf (bay) some distinguishing features. Among the largest gulfs (bays) of the world’s oceans are the Gulf of Alaska, the Bay of Bengal, the Bay of Biscay, the Great Australian Bight, and the Gulf of Guinea. In a number of cases the name “gulf” (bay) has been attached to bodies of water that, by their hydrologic conditions, are seas (the Gulf of Mexico, Hudson Bay, the Persian Gulf, the Gulf of California).

International law of gulfs (bays). The waters of gulfs (bays), like the waters of ports and sounds, are internal waters of the littoral state, that is, they are subject to its exclusive jurisdiction if the width of the entrance to the gulf (bay) does not exceed the size specified by international law. At the Geneva Conference on Maritime Law in 1958 a resolution was accepted by virtue of which a gulf (bay) with an entrance no greater than 24 nautical miles in width should belong to internal waters, provided its shores belong to one state. If the shores belong to two or more states, the control of the waters is decided by the states by mutual agreement, with consideration for the rightful interests of other states. International practice also recognizes as internal waters several so-called historical gulfs (bays), independent of the width of the entrance into them, by virtue of particular historical, economic, or other conditions: for example, Peter the Great Bay in the USSR, Hudson Bay in Canada, and the Bay of Mont-Saint-Michel in France.

gulf

[gəlf]
(geography)
An abyss or chasm.
A large extension of the sea partially enclosed by land.

gulf

1. a large deep bay
2. a deep chasm

Gulf

the
1. the Persian Gulf
2. Austral
a. the Gulf of Carpentaria
b. of, relating to, or adjoining the Gulf
3. NZ the Hauraki Gulf
References in classic literature ?
Beyond this flood a frozen Continent Lies dark and wilde, beat with perpetual storms Of Whirlwind and dire Hail, which on firm land Thaws not, but gathers heap, and ruin seems Of ancient pile; all else deep snow and ice, A gulf profound as that SERBONIAN Bog Betwixt DAMIATA and mount CASIUS old, Where Armies whole have sunk: the parching Air Burns frore, and cold performs th' effect of Fire.
Suez lies in the bottom of the Gulf, three leagues from Toro, once a place of note, now reduced, under the Turks, to an inconsiderable village, where the miserable inhabitants are forced to fetch water at three leagues' distance.
Sire," interposed the minister of police, "I came a moment ago to give your majesty fresh information which I had obtained on this head, when your majesty's attention was attracted by the terrible event that has occurred in the gulf, and now these facts will cease to interest your majesty.
From this lofty eminence, a vast and magnificent prospect unfolds itself; the great Gulf of California, with the dark blue sea beyond, studded with islands; and in another direction, the immense lava plain of San Gabriel.
On arriving towards the end of the second stage in this vertical journey, and shaking the long roots which were round me, to my consternation they snapped off one after another like so many pipe stems, and fell in fragments against the side of the gulf, splashing at last into the waters beneath.
The Scarecrow sat upon the Lion's back, and the big beast walked to the edge of the gulf and crouched down.
For an instant his eye was fixed upon the depths of the ocean, illumined by the last flashes of the Greek fire, which ran along the sides of the waves, played on the crests like plumes, and rendered still darker and more terrible the gulfs they covered.
So great was it that I thought it must be a mighty gulf until the mass of driftwood that came out upon the first ebb tide convinced me that it was the mouth of a river.
Then the shaggy man turned around and faced his enemies, standing just outside the opening, and as fast as they threw their heads at him he caught them and tossed them into the black gulf below.
The path was becoming rocky and difficult for the wheels of the chariot to pass over, and presently a deep gulf appeared at their feet which was too wide for them to leap.
More snow came before New Year's, and the harbor froze over, but the gulf still was free, beyond the white, imprisoned fields.
Perhaps after a short rise it had fallen upon the earth, or even in the Gulf of Mexico-- a fall which the narrowness of the peninsula of Florida would render not impossible.