Asplund, Erik Gunnar

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Asplund, Erik Gunnar

(ā`rĭk go͝on`när äs`plənd), 1885–1940, Swedish architect. He designed the central library of Stockholm (completed 1928), but he is best known for the group of pavilions that he planned for the Stockholm Exhibition of 1930. There Asplund employed the forms of the new architecture but added a dynamic line and a dignity of proportion of his own.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was these motifs (exaggerated arches, heavy Doric columns often strengthened with massive blocks of rustication), rather than delicate Palladian details, that appealed to those early 20th-century architects like Peter Behrens, Mies van der Rohe, Alvar Aalto and Gunnar Asplund whose neoclassicism evolved into modernism.
Perhaps it's because Asplund's buildings don't neatly fit into architectural categories, and thus have missed extensive survey in genre-specific considerations--but they certainly deserve the depth GUNNAR ASPLUND provides, here.
Sweden, indeed, demonstrates the positive side of the modernist attitude to death, with the haunting, tomb-less landscape of Stockholm's Woodland Cemetery, laid out by Gunnar Asplund and Sigurd Lewerentz, but this has not prevented older burial grounds, full of monuments, being carefully tended.
Contributors range from great names of the heroic inter-war period like Erik Gunnar Asplund and the elder Saarinen, Eliel, to giants of our time like Christian Norberg-Schulz, Kjell Lund and Juhani Pallasmaa.
Phaidon has two substantial monographs on twentieth-century architects, Peter Blundell Jones's Gunnar Asplund (October, 45 [pounds sterling]) and Robin McCarter's Louis Kahn (October, 45 [pounds sterling]) but the architectural book of the season is Zaha Hadid: Complete Works, edited by Patrick Schumachcr and Gordana Fontana Giusti: 'four volumes slip-cased in ruby-red Lucite' and almost a work of architecture in itself (Thames and Hudson, November, 75 [pounds sterling]).
This book does much to redress the lack of attention given to Gunnar Asplund who, following his death in 1940, was described by Alvar Aalto as 'the greatest among architects'.
The global list of architects or buildings under threat includes the 1962-63 Tyrone Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis, designed by Saarinen protege Ralph Rapson, the 1956-63 TWA Terminal by Eero Saarinen, Gunnar Asplund grain elevators, Breuer houses, the Buffalo granaries Le Corbusier made famous in Vers une Architecture, the 1961 Cyclorama by Neutra and Alexander.
Up through the 1940s this was mostly a version of Classicism: Edwardian Baroque, Beaux-Arts Classicism, monumental stripped Classicism, or the fundamental Classicism of Gunnar Asplund.
In the mid- 1930s Erik Gunnar Asplund, Erik Bryggman and Alvar Aalto made remarkably parallel moves away from the Functionalist aesthetics of reduction towards a layered and multi-sensory architecture.
As a result, Gunnar Asplund was appointed, and went on to attempt to bring the two tendencies together in a new Modernism.
Returning to Sweden, he studied for a short period at Stockholm's Academy of Art before setting up, with Gunnar Asplund and others, the independent Klara School.