Gurage


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Gurage

 

a people living in Ethiopia, in the southwestern regions of Shoa Province, in Arusi Province, and in Addis Ababa. Population, over 500,000 (1967, estimate). The Gu-rage language belongs to the Semitic group of the Hamito-Semitic languages. There are both Muslims and Monophysite Christians among the Gurage. Their basic occupations are agriculture and cattle raising. They are also famous as very skilled craftsmen. The Gurage is one of the groups of people in the emerging Ethiopian nation.

References in periodicals archive ?
Status of -n in nine languages/varieties Obligatory Optional Variable Arabic dialects, AP + Obj pro Omani, (weak) final + Obj pro verbs Classical Arabic, + imperfect V enerl, Tic Gurage + Obj pro Biblical Aramaic + Obj pro Jewish Palestinian + Obj pro Samaritan Aramaic + Obj pro Modern Western + Obj pro Aramaic Biblical Hebrew + Obj pro Ugaritic + Obj pro + verb (otiose -n) Table 6.
Gurage is a hilly land of small villages, rough roads, and poor sanitation.
The second person singular form [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (= * ata) drastically reduces the choice, (5) as East Gurage is the only Southern Ethiopian sub-branch where such forms are attested: Selti, Wolane, and Zway ata (Leslau 1979: 102; Gutt 1997: 911; Meyer 2006: 165; 2005: 77).
Lessons of peace and development; Gurage entrepreneurship in Ethiopia.
Low vision and blindness in adults in Gurage zone, central Ethiopia.
In 2002, in the Gurage zone (Muhur and Aklil Woreda), evangelical believers were beaten, their property taken, and their houses destroyed.
This chapter is a very welcome inclusion, and it is a relief that there is no attempt to cover all of the so-called Gurage languages in a single chapter.
Insofar as the latter domain is concerned, Kapeliuk reports that Wolf Leslau identified 1,300 Cushitic loanwords out of a total of 6,500 roots in his Etymological Dictionary of Gurage (Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1979).
This research follows in the tradition of her mentor and colleague--one of the greatest Jerusalem linguists of all times-Hans Jacob Polotsky, who already in 1938, in a famous article on Gurage published in BSLP ("Etudes de grammaire gourague," 39: 137-75), demonstrated that the [r] ~ [l] alternation in Chaha (spelled Chaxa by the author throughout the article) was reminiscent of Hebrew and Aramaic begedkefet spirantization (p.
The latter two studies are particularly welcome since the Gurage languages are so little explored, even today.
As for d in daqa 'laugh' in Western and Northern Gurage, it developed through dissimilation from saqa > Gafat saqa by assimilation > *taqa (s becoming t in South Ethiopic) > daqa by dissimilation.
This book, a reprinting of fifty-five of Leslau's articles on the Semitic Gurage languages of Ethiopia, is, perhaps, after his 1979 Etymological Dictionary of Gurage (reviewed in this journal: 102.