Gurungs

Gurungs

 

people inhabiting central and western Nepal. They number about 200.000 (1969, estimate). Their language belongs to the Himalayan group of the Sino-Tibetan family. Their religion is Hinduism, and the caste system has been preserved. Agriculture, herding, and handicrafts are their major occupations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Loshar marks the New Year of the indigenous Tamu community, or Gurungs, of Nepal.
The Gurungs of Gandaki region follow the Bon and Buddhist rituals in their cultural life.
The Gurungs had their own kingdom in Gandaki region, in western Nepal till 15th century A.
The language spoken by the Gurungs belongs to the Tibeto-Burman family, and it has a close resemblance with Tamang and Thakali languages.
Gurungs, who call themselves Tamu, are indigenous inhabitants of west-central parts of Nepal.
Gurungs all across the world celebrate Tamu Losar by organising rallies and cultural programmes.
Though the book claims to deal with the world of Adivasi/Janajati, there are at least four articles which exclusively focus on Gurungs only such as "Gurung Jati Bare" (About the Gurungs), "Tamujati: Auta Manthan" (Tamu Jati: Some Discussions), "Tamu Sankritiko Jagerna" (Protection of Tamu Culture) and "Gurung Bare Auta Thakali Katha" (A Thakali story about the Gurung).
Gurung Jatika Sirsastha Pragiky Byaktiharu (Top Academicians among the Gurungs).
Generally, the Gurungs prefer to have equal numbers of sons and daughters (Macfarlane 1976).
There is a strong preference for sons, which can be attributed to the patriarchal norms and values among the Gurungs nearly the same as "Hindu" and the cultural and economic roles, the sons play in the family and society.
Lahachok village was dominated by Brahmins and the Riban village by Gurungs.
It contributed about 60 per cent to the total income of Gurungs, 25 per cent to the Brahmin households, 26 per cent to the Chettris and 9 per cent to the members of the dalit group.