Guy of Warwick


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Guy of Warwick

(wŏr`ĭk), English legendary hero, popularized by an anonymous 14th-century rhymed romance. Guy won the earl of Warwick's daughter and saved England from the Danes by killing the giant Colbrand; he later renounced worldly vanities and ended his days as a hermit. The story probably has a historical basis. Its popularity lasted through the 17th and 18th cent.
References in classic literature ?
I should like to tell you of Guy of Warwick, of King Horn, of William and the Werewolf, and of many others.
Named after the Saxon hero Guy of Warwick, it was used to cook stew for soldiers.
The earliest citation is dated to 1330 and comes from Guy of Warwick (MS Auchinleck).
Originally named Guy's Cliffe after the stone outcrops that tower over the river and the legendary hero Guy of Warwick, the site's history will be recalled by Terry Roberts.
Robert Rouse uses Guy of Warwick as exemplary illustration of a shift in the geography of romance in "Walking (between) the Lines: Romance as Itinerary/Map," a geography seen first in Guy as an itinerary of chivalric maturation, then one of spiritual pilgrimage, but also to be seen anew as a mapping of mercantile space.
Andrew Jenkin has won the Hamer Award with his Autumn Gold watercolour, much more impressionistic than the majority of his work, like one of his medieval series, Sir Guy of Warwick and the Dragon of Longwitton (mixed media).
TherewereMedievalhermitshereand, legend had it, Guy of Warwick himself, the eponymous hero of the spot, once lived in a cave belowthe chapel.
The book, the author tells us, is "a study of medieval writers in later print" (vii), and the writers or written works she includes are, primarily, Beowulf, Piers Plowman, Guy of Warwick and Bevis of Hampton, John Gower, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Jean Froissart.
Further characters in a complete set were based on The Nine Worthies according to Shakespeare and Dryden, Three Christian Knights, Godfrey de Bouillon also known as Guy of Warwick, the Three Pagans included Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar and The Mystical Figures included Christ, of course, and the Three Jews were joined by King David and Judas Maccabaeus.
Allison Shell's juxtaposition of Robert Southwell and Shakespeare, of religious and secular poetry, is both sophisticated and complex, as are Helen Cooper's speculations on Shakespeare's possible appearances, both textual and actual, in Guy of Warwick.
Pious formulae give coherence the various genres of the Auchinleck manuscript, a coherence mimicked in microcosm by the numinous tags that connect the disparate generic elements of Guy of Warwick.
Richmond's The Legend of Guy of Warwick is a compendium of the many places where Guy of Warwick's legends have appeared from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century, providing, in a way, a catalogue of Guy materials.