Gwynedd


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Gwynedd

(gwĭn`ĕth, gwŭn`–), county, 984 sq mi (2,548 sq km), NW Wales. Established as a county in 1974 through the union of Anglesey, Caernarvonshire, and parts of Denbighshire and Merionethshire, Gwynedd was reduced in 1996 by the separation of AngleseyAnglesey
or Anglesea
, island and county (1985 est. pop. 68,800), 278 sq mi (719 sq km), NW Wales. Beaumaris is the chief town. It is a region of low, rolling hills. The principal industries are agriculture and stock raising.
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 and the loss of its northeastern section to Conwy. Caernarvon, the administrative center, is where the Prince of Wales is invested; Bangor is an educational center with a university. Much of the county, excepting the Lleyn Peninsula, lies within Snowdonia National Park.

Gwynedd

a county of NW Wales, formed in 1974 from Anglesey, Caernarvonshire, part of Denbighshire, and most of Merionethshire; lost Anglesey and part of the NE in 1996: generally mountainous with many lakes, much of it lying in Snowdonia National Park. Administrative centre: Caernarfon. Pop.: 117 500 (2003 est.). Area: 2550 sq. km (869 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Gwynedd Council has a good track record for local sourcing, buying in Welsh Lamb throughout the year, but for its week-long campaign it focussed entirely on lamb from within the county.
Wales was broken up into 12 areas for the research and following Gwynedd in second place was Flintshire and Wrexham.
Gwynedd has 119 schools which, according to Gwynedd Ratepayer, means an average of 6 staff at each school if no one does anything else.
It now appears their pleas haven't fallen on deaf ears as both Gwynedd Council and Cartrefi Cymunedol Gwynedd (CCG) have agreed to carry out the work.
It is interesting to note that the council's own Performance Report for 2014-15 says that "only 28% of Gwynedd residents felt that they could influence decisions in their local community".
Housing association Cartrefi Cymunedol Gwynedd (CCG) is offering community and voluntary groups the chance to apply for funding of up to pounds 10,000 towards events, training, improving local facilities and schemes to improve local surroundings.
Gwynedd Council, Mantell Gwynedd, Diverse Cymru, North Wales Refugee Support group and Caernarfon Refugee Support Group all came together so the county is ready to accept refugees.
Quentin Deakin Founder of SOS Gwynedd Tywyn, Gwynedd
As a retired Gwynedd councillor he must be aware that when the Plaid Cymru big shots on the council dropped their bombshell by suddenly announcing they intended to close, in one fell swoop, 27 primary schools in Meirionnydd and Dwyfor, two of the poorest areas in Gwynedd, quite a number of his fellow councillors, of varying political persuasions, refused point blank to support this measure.
Now these options will form the basis of a county-wide public engagement programme, with drop-in sessions, public meetings and a Gwynedd Challenge questionnaire.
Now Gwynedd Council's Galw Gwynedd service in Penrhyndeudraeth has been selected to provide this service under a three-year contract.
The plans have caused uproar in Gwynedd with fishermen and tourist operators backed by politicians, calling for them to be dropped.