Gyangtse

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Gyangtse

 

(or Gyantse), a town in China, in the Autonomous Region of Tibet. It is a road junction and trading center in the valley of the Nyang Chu River. Woolen fabrics and rugs are produced in Gyangtse, and it is the site of a number of monasteries.

References in periodicals archive ?
We go around the Yamdrok Lake and make our way to Gyantse, another small city on the traditional trading route to India.
Copies of letters he wrote to his family describing the "beastly" ascent to the Gyantse Jong fort also formed part of the auction.
As in the case of the rectangular chapels in the 15th-century Great Stupa of Gyantse, southwest Tibet, which are regularly defined as dkyil-'khor (Tibetan for "mandala") in the contemporary inscriptions and texts describing them.
Recent research by a professor at Tibet University, for example, indicates that the practice of fraternal polyandry in Gyantse county of central Tibet continues to be widespread, despite having been formally outlawed years ago by the Chinese government (Dekyi).
The small town of Gyantse features Tibetan Buddhist art at the Kumbum Pagoda and provides opportunities to learn about Buddhism at the Pelkhor Monastery.
Fraser's report on painting workshops in the 1940s, following the systematic destruction of Tibetan art and architecture during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and before; meaning and festival use of giant ritual applique thang kas in Gyantse, by Michael Henss; and recent textual evidence for the biography of the 17th-century Karma pa of Tibet, by Irmgard Mengele (author affiliations are not noted).
Under the agreement, the British secured rights to establish trade marts at Gyantse, Yatung and Gartok, and virtually established a British protectorate on Tibet.
In the Pel Kor monastery in Gyantse, director Choephel, learns irreplaceable statues have been stolen and suspects it is an inside job.
In addition, 'outdoors-men' on the 9-day Classical and Namtso Lake camping tour will allow tourists to visit famous places such as Gyantse and Shigatse.
For instance one British officer accompanying Younghusband's mission to Tibet in 1904 had mentioned that all seven Nepalese traders at Gyantse had kept Tibetan wives (Waddell 1975: 214).
Tibetan issues are well represented; "A Year in Tibet", is an uncensored documentary series about Gyantse, Tibet's third largest town.