Gyrocotyloidea

Gyrocotyloidea

[¦jī·rō‚käd·əl′ȯid·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
A class of trematode worms according to some systems of classification.

Gyrocotyloidea

 

a class of parasitic flatworms that occupies a position intermediate between tapeworms and monogenetic flukes. The body length is usually 2-3 cm, more rarely up to 10 cm. There are five species (the independence of some species is in dispute); they live in the spiral valve (of the intestinal tract) of chimaeras (deep-sea fishes); they are found in various regions of the world ocean. Characteristic of Gyrocotyloidea are the absence of an intestinal tract and presence of a complexly constructed rosette-like organ for attachment on the posterior end of its body. From the oval egg, which is equipped with a peduncle, a larva develops, the so-called lycophore, with ten identical hooks on its posterior end. The cycle of development is apparently direct. Many assign Gyrocotyloidea to the subclass Cestodaria of the class Cestoidea (tapeworms); some consider them highly modified monogenetic flukes.

REFERENCES

Bykhovskii, B. E. “Ontogenez i filogeneticheskie vzaimootnosheniia ploskikh paraziticheskikh chervei.” Izv. AN SSSR: Seriia biologicheskaia, 1937, vol. 4, pp. 1353-82.
Shul’ts, O. S., and E. V. Gvozdev. Osnovy obshchei gel’mintologii. Moscow, 1970.

B. E. BYKHOVSKII