swine influenza

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swine influenza

[′swin ‚in·flü′en·zə]
(veterinary medicine)
A disease of swine caused by the associated effects of a filterable virus and Hemophilus suis, characterized by inflammation of the upper respiratory tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers also tested the experimental vaccine's ability to protect ferrets from infection with a 2007 strain of H1N1 influenza virus-a strain it had not been specifically designed to prevent.
Recipients of vaccine against the 1976 "swine flu" have enhanced neutralization responses to the 2009 novel H1N1 influenza virus.
2009) Critical care services and 2009 H1N1 influenza in Australia and New Zealand.
For each case, five pregnant women who tested negative for H1N1 influenza or were untested were randomly chosen from each site's database and matched by estimated date of confinement and site.
A total sample size of 66 patients (33 in patients with H1N1 and 33 patients without H1N1) would be needed to detect a difference of 9 [micro]g/l in PCT between those who were positive and negative to H1N1 influenza (alpha level 5%; power 80%) (26).
Numerous other aspects of the health care response included the availability and timeliness of confirmatory testing for 2009 H1N1 influenza by state and other public health laboratories, as well as elements of individual laboratory preparedness and response.
If the behavior of the seasonal form of H1N1 influenza virus is any indication, scientists say that chances are good that most strains of the pandemic H1N1 flu virus will become resistant to Tamiflu, the main drug stockpiled for use against it.
Two people with compromised immune systems who became ill with 2009 H1N1 influenza developed drug-resistant strains of virus after less than two weeks on therapy, report doctors from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
A recent statement sent to Gulf News by Dr Jamal Al Mutawa, Section Head, Communicable Diseases at Health Authority-Abu Dhabi (HAAD), said: "The H1N1 influenza continues to have evidence of being active, but with declining transmission or remain low in Abu Dhabi.
This demonstrates the fact that flu is unpredictable and we just don't know what will happen in the coming weeks and months with the spread of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus," Quimby says.
Summary: The number of H1N1 influenza patients has fallen sharply in Egypt since the start of 2010, but health officials say they are bracing for a second wave of infections.