herpes simplex virus

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Related to HSV-2 infection: Yeast infection, Hsv2

herpes simplex virus

[¦hər‚pēz ′sim‚pleks ′vī·rəs]
(virology)
Either of two types of subgroup A herpesviruses that are specific for humans; given the binomial designation Herpesvirus hominis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Living with symptomatic HSV-2 infection can result in several psychological concerns including fear of transmission to others, anxiety about possible long-term consequences for general health, difficulties with intimacy and spontaneity, and feelings of undesirability (Green & Kocsis, 1997; Luby & Klinge, 1985).
Douglas, director of CDC's Division of STD Prevention, commented that the high prevalence of herpes in African Americans is particularly concerning given the linkage between HSV-2 infection and HIV.
In analyses controlling for study arm, study site, age, race and a variety of risky behaviors, men with recent incident HSV-2 infection and those with prevalent infection were significantly more likely than those who remained free of HSV-2 to acquire HIV (hazard ratios, 3.
The association between HSV-2 infection and psychosis still held.
In one of two studies presented, Genocea researchers studied the T cell immune responses to each HSV-2 protein among patients with HSV-2 infection or exposure.
For decades, researchers have focused on "subunit" herpes vaccines that rely primarily on gD-2 as the antigen to stimulate the body's antibody response but none has prevented HSV-2 infection in humans.
Taylor explained that biological factors among women may increase their susceptibility to HSV-2 infection, and that complex social, biological, and environmental factors could contribute to the higher HSV-2 prevalence among African Americans.
HSV-2 infection can cause recurrent sores and breaks in the skin of the genital region, which can be mild and often go unnoticed.
They stress that, in the absence of a strong connection between orphans' schooling and sexual risk, or of data on whether leaving school early precedes or follows HIV or HSV-2 infection, "longitudinal research may help to understand the timing of events, like school drop-out and marriage, in relation to parent loss, and better trace the causal pathways of orphans' risk.
This under-recognition can be attributed to the fact that the leading cause of HSV-2 infection is asymptomatic shedding of the virus.
In multivariate analyses, the risk of HSV-2 infection was significantly higher among both women (hazard ratio, 1.
The analysis of serologic correlates of HHV-8 infection showed a significant association with HSV-2 infection (Table 2).