Haanja


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Haanja

 

an upland in the southeastern part of the Estonian SSR, on the border with the RSFSR and the Latvian SSR. The Haanja Upland is a divide separating the rivers in the area drained by the Zapadnaia Dvina (the Daugava) and the Gauja from the rivers flowing into Lake Pskov. Its maximum elevation is 318 m (Mount Suur Munamâgi). The upland is composed of Devonian dolomites and limestones covered with glacial deposits. The terrain is characterized by morainic hills and has many lakes. The area is heavily forested with conifers.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the Haanja Uplands, the extensive retreating of forests and the spread of rye cultivation similarly began in about the middle of the first millennium: in the surroundings of Lake Kulajarv at Plaani in about AD 500, and around Lake Verijarv in AD 700 (Niinemets 2008, 66).
The highest annual number of TDs, as well as of SCTDs, and their highest annual duration were registered at the Voru station, situated in southeastern Estonia in a primeval valley between the Haanja and Otepaa uplands.
The till-covered plain of the Estonian part of the catchment is higher in the south-west and north-west due to the presence of uplands (Pandivere, Haanja, Otepaa, and Sakala) (Iital et al.
Everything is confusing and [the teachers think] that we are grown-ups, but we are not (Pupils, Haanja School, same basic school).
The maximal amplitudes of absolute heights of the bedrock surface are close to those of the modern topography, being lowest in the ancient valleys (Harku valley -145 m) and highest in the Haanja Heights (+166 m).
Since the beginning of research into the deglaciation history of Estonia, the Haanja Stade has always been considered the oldest Late Weichselian stadial on Estonian territory.
Well-expressed ridge topography is quite frequent also in Estonia, particularly outside the aforementioned esker distribution area, for example a dense pattern of subparallel sand ridges in the Karula glacial complex, southern Estonia (Karukapp 1974) and Kisejarve irregular net of ridges in the central lobe depression of the Haanja glacial accumulative heights (Karukapp 1997).
The authors conclude that at least parts of the Haanja Heights were ice-free by 14 000 cal yr BP and there was a clear short-lived warming episode centred to 13 800 cal yr BP.
The ice-shed line (Karukapp 2004) amid the glacier flows of the Gulf of Riga (Baltic ice stream complex) and Lake Peipsi-Pskov, starting between the junction of Salpausselka end moraine arcs in the north (Lundqvist 1987) and running along the Pandivere Upland, and the Otepaa and Haanja Heights and the Latgale Upland consecutively in the south, delimits a narrow NW-SE-trending area of a possibly thinner and inactive glacier that may have been more vulnerable to the Belling-Allered warming (GI-1; Lowe et al.