Habima Theater

Habima Theater

(häbē`mä), [Heb.,=the stage], the national theater of Israel. Founded in 1917 in Moscow by Nahum Zemach and at first affiliated with the Moscow Art Theatre, it was one of the first Hebrew-language theaters. In 1926 the company left the Soviet Union and toured extensively for several years before settling in Palestine in 1931, and it was designated the national theater in 1958. Among its best-known productions are The Dybbuk, The Golem, and Oedipus Rex.

Bibliography

See E. Levy, The Habima, Israel's National Theatre, 1917–1977 (1979).

Habima Theater

national theater of Israel; its troupe is famous for passionate acting style. [Israeli Hist.: NCE, 1170]
See: Theater
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References in periodicals archive ?
Monday evening the Jazz formation The Bulchemists of 6 young Bulgarian Jews living in Israel performed for the Bulgarian delegation at a cocktail reception at the Habima Theater in Tel Aviv.
Israel's Habima Theater staged the play as part of the Globe to Globe festival in London, where 37 plays are being performed in 37 languages by theater companies around the globe.
The group asked London's Globe Theatre to withdraw its invitation to Israel's Habima Theater to participate in the World Shakespeare Festival, on the grounds that Habima has organized plays in Israeli settlements.
When the Habima Theater in Palestine rehearsed its controversial adaptation of the play in 1947, their British director Tyrone Guthrie was appalled at his star actress' insistence on wailing as she delivered her lines: "You are to play a fighting tigress and not a lamenting Jewish mother," he quipped.
Habima Theater in Tel Aviv produced it in Hebrew in 1936.