Habitat

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habitat

the environment in which an animal or plant normally lives or grows

Habitat

The sum of the environmental conditions that determine the existence of a community in a specific place where humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms live and its surroundings, both living and nonliving.

Habitat

 

an area of land or water occupied by an organism, a group of a single species, a biocenosis, or a synousia and possessing all conditions required for its existence (climate, topography, soil, food).

The habitat of a species is defined as the total area within the species’ range of distribution that satisfies the species’ ecological requirements. The habitat of a population is the part of the species’ habitat that will guarantee the existence of a population. The habitat of an individual is the actual area occupied by a given individual in all phases of its development. There are also animal habitats of family, herd, flock, or colony. There are plant habitats of groves, beds, and other communities. In terms of the use of a habitat, organisms are classified as stenotopic, occupying similar habitats only, and eurytopic, capable of occupying a variety of habitats within the given range of distribution.

The habitats of many species vary with the stage of development in the organism’s life cycle. For example, the larvae of amphibians usually live in water, and the adults on land. Many parasites have a dormant phase outside the given host and an active phase within the host (often limited even to certain organs). The various developmental phases of many parasitic plants are associated with different plant hosts. The part of the habitat that a species occupies for a limited time only (a season, a part of a day) or for a particular purpose (feeding, reproduction) is called a station. The habitat of a biocenosis is called a biotope.

REFERENCES

Naumov, N. P. Ekologiia zhivotnykh, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1963.
Osnovy lesnoi biogeotsenologii. Edited by V. N. Sukachev and N. V. Dylis. Moscow, 1964.

N. P. NAUMOV

habitat

[′hab·ə‚tat]
(ecology)
The part of the physical environment in which a plant or animal lives.

Habitat

(networking, graphics)
The original term for on-line graphical virtual communities or worlds. Created at Lucasfilm in 1985 by Randy Farmer and Chip Morningstar.

http://communities.com/habitat.html.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, few doubt the negative effects that continued poaching will have on the butterfly's habitat in years to come.
Now, along 25 acres of the creek's north bank, pollution has been replaced by oak, sycamore and ash saplings, the beginnings of a riparian habitat that once thrived in the area.
CONTACT: Wildlife Habitat Council, 1010 Wayne Avenue, Suite 920, Silver Spring, MD 20912/(301)588-8994.
Under the partners for Wildlife program, landowners sign habitat restoration agreements identifying restoration activities that will take place on the property, the period that the landowner will keep the site in its restored condition (25 years is the desired period), and the costs of the restoration.
Greater population increases have been limited by poor spawning habitat from degraded channel geomorphology, low flows, poor water quality, high water temperatures, and predation of smolts by warm water fish.
4, 2000, opposing the designations of critical habitat based upon their contention that there were no records of the toads within the proposed project area and that the habitat was not suitable.
There has not been enough coverage of these issues and our general public is not being educated on the loss of habitat and how it contributes to the further decline of rare or endangered species.
According to Perry Donahoo, Southern Division president, "We are doubly honored to have the Reed quarry certified as a wildlife habitat and recognized as "Rookie of the Year" by WHC.
The agency's Ventura office is determining critical habitat for the arroyo toad.
It leaves a toxic legacy of oil spills and pollution that threatens birds and wildlife in the very habitats meant to protect them.
Any species that survived has shown resilience in the face of massive habitat change.
Fujifilm's support of the National Zoo has helped fulfill its mission to "celebrate, study and protect" wildlife and habitats throughout the world by: