Hadley cell

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Hadley cell

[′had·lē ‚sel]
(meteorology)
A direct, thermally driven, and zonally symmetric circulation first proposed by George Hadley as an explanation for the trade winds; it consists of the equatorward movement of the trade winds between about latitude 30° and the equator in each hemisphere, with rising wind components near the equator, poleward flow aloft, and finally descending components at about latitude 30° again.
References in periodicals archive ?
Real-world applications of the Hadley circulation are presented using advanced graphics [Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) by Unidata (2012)] to highlight connections to the laboratory experiment.
The bottom flow is directly analogous to the easterly (trade) winds of the low-latitude Hadley circulation.
6 (top) National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR) reanalysis climatological wintermean [December-February (DJF)] data are used to map the main features of the Hadley circulation and strengthen the connection between the real world and the tank experiment.
Meridional winds tend to be large in the tropical band and small everywhere else--a clear signal of the Hadley circulation confined to the tropical belt.
Using the above material, the connection between the laboratory flows and the observed Hadley circulation can be made clearly evident.
This so-called Hadley circulation ensures that most dust lofted into the atmosphere in the tropics doesn't travel to other parts of the world.
This provided a weaker driving force for the Hadley circulation, and Chylek's calculations show that the warm, high-altitude tropical air may have reached latitudes of only 27 [degrees] before it fell back to Earth.
He also applied these theoretical approaches and related entropy, energy, and angular momentum conservation principles to the First Global Atmospheric Research Project (GARP) Global Experiment (FGGE) and Global Weather Experiment (GWE) data to describe the equator-to-polar extent of the Hadley circulation and embedded Ferrei cells.