hadron

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Related to Hadrons: antiquark, Mesons, Baryons

Hadron

The generic name of a class of particles which interact strongly with one another. Examples of hadrons are protons, neutrons, the &pgr;, K, and D mesons, and their antiparticles. Protons and neutrons, which are the constituents of ordinary nuclei, are members of a hadronic subclass called baryons, as are strange and charmed baryons. Baryons have half-integral spin, obey Fermi-Dirac statistics, and are known as fermions. Mesons, the other subclass of hadrons, have zero or integral spin, obey Bose-Einstein statistics, and are known as bosons. The electric charges of baryons and mesons are either zero or ±1 times the charge on the electron. Masses of the known mesons and baryons cover a wide range, extending from the pi meson, with a mass approximately one-seventh that of the proton, to values of the order of 10 times the proton mass. The spectrum of meson and baryon masses is not understood. See Baryon, Bose-Einstein statistics, Fermi-Dirac statistics, Meson, Neutron, Proton

Based on an enormous body of data, hadrons are now thought to consist of elementary fermion constituents known as quarks which have electric charges of + |e| and |e|, where |e| is the absolute value of the electron charge. For example, a quark-antiquark pair makes up a meson, while three quarks constitute a baryon. See Elementary particle, Quarks

hadron

(had -ron) See elementary particles. See also Big Bang theory.

hadron

[′had‚rän]
(particle physics)
An elementary particle which has strong interactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
com/cern-lhc-update-large-hadron-collider-smashes-energy-record-lead-ion-collisions-2201372) successful in recreating this exotic soup during high-energy collisions between heavy ions of gold and lead - carried out in particle accelerators like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - we still do not have a comprehensive understanding of the inner workings of this ephemeral plasma state.
0] [right arrow] 0), they become condensed in the hadrons.
First of all, we told them that our conclusions about the Higgs were only tentative and needed further confirmation, then we explained that even if we had found it, it was not THE Higgs Boson, but only A Higgs Boson, and there might be a lot more of them that we should keep looking for; and then we told them that this is, after all, a large hadron collider, and we really ought to be trying to collide some small hadrons too, which could lead to the discovery of a smaller Higgs Boson, which would take up less space than the Higgs Boson we've got already, thus leaving room for any further discoveries that might be made in the fullness of time.
There were but a few of these quarks, each accompanied by an antiquark, and by grouping them in different combinations, either two or three at a time, the various hadrons could be accounted for.
Last August, scientists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of a (http://www.
The men cheered, and night after bitterly cold night they sailed around pursuing the missing bosun, while continuing to smash hadrons into each other for amusement.
With regards to quarks, Sakata has considered in 1956 three basic hadrons (proton, neutron, and alphaparticle) and three basic leptons (electron, muon, neutrino).
Quarks are the building blocks of protons, neutrons, and other particles known generally as hadrons.
While there may be only twelve leptons (see above), there are a large number of hadrons, beginning with the pion, which is the least massive hadron, through over a hundred more massive ones.
Well, can you tell me, for example, whether the LHC has collided any hadrons yet?
Of most interesting here is that this method gives results in the from of 1-parameter light-front Schrodinger equation for QCD which determines the eigenspectrum and the light-front wavefunctions of hadrons for general spin and orbital angular momentum.
An introductory chapter looks at hadrons as systems of constituent quarks.