hematogenous

(redirected from Haematogenous)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
Related to Haematogenous: hematogenous, haematogenous spread

hematogenous

[¦hēm·ə¦täj·ə·nəs]
(physiology)
Pertaining to the production of blood or of its fractions.
Carried by way of the bloodstream.
Originating in blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cancer is not a homogenous disease in terms of outcome; solid tumours often have a lesser impact on mortality than haematogenous cancers, and even in the latter group, there is wide variation in the prognoses depending on the exact type of tumour and the treatment stage.
Orbital cellulitis occurs in the following three situations: (1) extension of an infection from the periorbital structures, most commonly arising from the paranasal sinuses (the face, globe and lacrimal sac may also be a source of infection); (2) direct inoculation of the orbit from trauma or surgery; and (3) haematogenous spread from bacteraemia (bacteria in the blood).
In control group there is a positive relation between haematogenous and histogenous cell populations, where fibroblasts, macrophages, lymphocytes and fibrocytes actively participate in its formation.
Persistence of the fever leads to anaemia and a haematogenous jaundice, owing to the destruction of the red blood-disks by the parasites.
Lesions are typically supratentorial, mainly at the corticomedullary junction (as a result of haematogenous spread), the basal ganglia or the thalamus.
Inhibitory effect of Korean mistletoe (Viscum album coloratum) extract on tumor angiogenesis and metastasis of haematogenous and nonhaematogenous tumor cells in mice.
Haematogenous salmonella infection around a metal hip endoprosthesis.
Haematogenous dissemination of prostatic epithelial cells during radical prostatectomy.
In addition, despite the spleen's role as a haematogenous filter of effete cells and blood borne antigens it is not a favoured target of metastatic cancer either (3,7).
In HIV-positive individuals there is poor granuloma formation, little or absent caseous necrosis, poor containment of mycobacteria with large organism loads and haematogenous dissemination.
It is postulated that under favourable conditions extrapulmonary dissemination can occur via the lymphatic and haematogenous routes.