Haemonchosis

Haemonchosis

 

a helminthic disease of ruminants caused by nematodes of the genus Haemonchus. It is found throughout the world. Haemonchus worms are small parasites (18-35 mm in length). The larvae develop in the external environment. Young animals are most susceptible to haemonchosis. In the southern regions haemonchosis in sheep sometimes occurs in enzootic form (most often in years with abundant precipitation). Invasion by Haemonchus causes serious disorders of the entire organism, which manifest themselves by the affliction of the intestines, nervous system, blood-producing organs, and endocrine glands. In young animals this frequently causes death. Treatment consists of phenothiazine, which is fed to the animals mixed with crushed grain. This same preparation is used for preventive purposes. Rotating pastures, biothermal disinfection of manure, and high quality feed for the animal also play a substantial role in the prevention of haemonchosis.

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Effect of Haemonchosis on haematology and non specific phosphomonoesterase activities in sheep and goats.
The effect of haemonchosis and blood loss into the abomasum on digestion in sheep.
2012 Influence of dietary supplementation with Acacia karroo on experimental haemonchosis in indigenous Xhosa lop-eared goats of South Africa.