Haemoproteus


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Related to Haemoproteus: leucocytozoon

Haemoproteus

 

a genus of parasitic protozoans of the suborder Hemosporidia, order Coccidia. There are approximately 50 species, widely distributed. Asexual reproduction of Haemoproteus (schizogony) occurs in the endothelium of blood vessels (predominantly in the lungs) in birds and also in reptiles—lizards, tortoises, and snakes. Gametocytes enter the erythrocytes. The sexual process and sporogony occur in blood-sucking dipterous insects, which serve as the carriers of Haemoproteus and which, upon attacking vertebrate animals, infect them. Haemoproteus causes serious disease in chicks. No pathogenic effect is observed in adult fowl.

IU. I. POLIANSKII

References in periodicals archive ?
2% (49/52) de las aves fueron positivas a hemoparasitos, identificandose tres especies: Haemoproteus sp, Plasmodium sp y Leucocytozoon sp (Figura 1).
Therapeutic effects of some antihaematozoal drugs against Haemoproteus columbae in domestic pigeons.
Hippoboscid flies are known vectors of parasites of the genus Trypanosoma and Haemoproteus (Santiago-Alarcon et al.
Prevalence and potential vectors of Haemoproteus in Nebraska mouring doves.
Protozoa parasites were identified in these research study were consist of Haemoproteus colombae, Ttichomonas gallinae, Cryposporidium and Eimeria that resembling reported by they work on external and internal parasites of the pigeon from east of Iran.
Occurrence of Leucocytozoon and Haemoproteus (Apicomplexa, Haemosporina) in Falconiformes and Strigiformes of Italy.
Pathogenicity and epizootiology of avian haematozoa: Plasmodium, Leucocytozoon, and Haemoproteus.
Haemoproteus columbae were only found in columbids; Haemoproteus caprimulgi occurred in the nightjar Caprimulgus nigrescens.
Therefore, the variation in Haemoproteus prevalence is not likely to be related to genetic differentiation of the host populations.
Haemoproteus columbae, is a common haemoprotozoan infection in them (Powers, 2002).