Hague School


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Hague School

 

a school of Dutch realistic painting of the last third of the 19th century that formed around Jozef Israels after 1871. The Hague School creatively developed the traditions of 17th-century Dutch art and strove toward an emotional, lyrical perception of everyday life and toward a free, picturesque style of painting. The members of the school mainly produced genre paintings (Israels), landscapes (J. H. Weissenbruch, the Maris brothers, and H. W. Mesdag), and interiors (J. Bosboom).

REFERENCE

Marius, G. H. De Hollandsche schilderkunst in de negentiende eeuw, 2nd ed. The Hague, 1903.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the help of the recentlyestablished Berwick Visual Arts, the collection is to be exhibited at the Granary Gallery over the next three years, with the first themed display - focusing on The Hague School, 19th Century Glasgow painters and Berwick-inspired works - showing from now until December 16.
The items in the Artifort collection which had a more modern design were generally inspired by contemporary trends, such as the Amsterdam School, the Hague School, and the French Art Dco style.
Being Dutch by birth, he learned to paint trees, barns, and windmills in a naturalistic way at the Hague School.
He received a diploma from The Hague School of International Law and is a former fellow of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York.
1) to the Dutch state in 1903, the collection features fine examples by Mesdag and his Hague School colleagues--including Jacob and Willem Maris, Jozef Israels and Anton Mauve --as well as spectacular French pictures by realist and Barbizon masters, including Courbet, Millet and Daubigny, who exerted a decisive influence on Dutch artists of the era.
It would appear that he acted to some extent as a marchand-amateur, buying and selling pictures not so much for the sake of profit but as a means of influencing tastes and making a market for the Hague School brand.
The Mesdag Collection's emphasis on the Hague School made it an especially good fit in this plan.
Discreet flat-screen video monitors offer nicely produced presentations on the Hague School, Mesdag's life story and the history of the collection.
Right from the beginning of his activities as a collector in the 1880s he had sought out Hague School paintings in particular--a taste shared with many of his countrymen at the time, and fed by local dealers, such as Alexander Reid (1854-1928) and Craibe Angus (1830-99), who also supplied many of his 19th-century French pictures.
However, his marked preference for paintings featuring the human form is consistent with his taste in other schools, of whatever date (only his holdings of Hague School artists provide a partial exception), and indeed in other cultures.
Fowle, 'The Hague School and the Scots--A Taste for Dutch Pictures', APOLLO, vol.