hair cell

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hair cell

[′her ‚sel]
(histology)
The basic sensory unit of the inner ear of vertebrates; a columnar, polarized structure with specialized cilia on the free surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
While small-molecule compounds are still a long way from the clinic, these results are another small step on the long road to a drug for hearing loss that could be infused into the cochlea to generate new hair cells.
Other research, such as that led by Charles Liberman, a professor of otology and lanyngology at Harvard Medical School, is looking into regenerating the damaged auditory nerve terminals, reestablishing the broken links to hair cells.
We designed the present study to evaluate the effect of aminoglycoside therapy on the outer hair cells of neonates.
The finding that newborn hair cells regenerate spontaneously is novel," senior author Dr.
In October, Roche joined forces with venture capital firm Versant Ventures and biotech Inception Sciences to find molecules targeting ear hair cell protection and regeneration in the cochlea, the spiral-shaped cavity in the inner ear.
When you stop the fluid keeps moving for a few seconds and the hair cells start sending messages to the brain again.
With each exposure to loud noise--whether continuous or sudden--your hair cells are literally working themselves to death.
In particular, she described the genes for myosin-7a and cadherin-23, which are key components in the transduction mechanism in hair cells, and mutations of which underlie forms of Usher Syndrome.
This is the first evidence that inner and outer hair cells develop independently of one another," said lead researcher Dr Sung-Ho Huh, from Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, US.
Damage to hair cells may also affect balance, causing symptoms of vertigo and dizziness.
The work shows that a small number of cells can migrate to the damaged cochlea and repair sensory hair cells and neurons.
AN EARLY step towards curing deafness has been taken by scientists who used gene therapy to grow hair cells sensitive to sound vibrations in the inner ears of mice.