Half-Timbering


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Half-Timbering

 

a type of wall construction used mainly for low buildings. Half-timbering consists of a frame formed by a system of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal wooden beams: the interstices are filled with stone, brick, adobe, or other material. Since the late 19th century, metal and reinforced-concrete beams have also been used. Half-timbering was widespread in Western Europe in the Middle Ages. The wooden uprights, crossbars, and diagonal struts that partitioned the walls lent a decorative and expressive appearance to the facade.

In modern construction, half-timbering with a wooden frame and a brick or adobe filling is used principally in regions with a warm climate. It may also be used for auxiliary production buildings.

References in periodicals archive ?
Norman Shaw's half-timbering, for example, is completely out of place in these northern fells; as are the thousands of rhododendrons, presumably planted by Armstrong's wife, which now surround the place.
Lots of cream rendered brickwork, half-timbering, dormer roofs and enough UPVC windows to rebuild a naff Crystal Palace (as in the world's biggest conservatory, not the soccer team).
There is much half-timbering in the house, particularly in the 35ft by 20ft billiard room, which has an open-framed ceiling with a central skylight.
In the fashion of the times, he added fancy half-timbering, masking what is essentially a functional Victorian building, containing two swimming pools, known to generations of Cestrian school children as the Atlantic and Pacific.
A public house with extensive stabling arose to welcome visitors, and it later took on entirely fictitious half-timbering to give it the appropriate rural feel.
There is half-timbering on the exterior of the gable end of the building although inside the exposed beams are now covered.
The ground floor accommodation includes a spacious reception hall featuring archway with exposed half-timbering and glass-fronted display cupboard; fitted cloakroom; inner hall; sitting room with natural stone fireplace and coal effect fire, tiled hearth and raised side shelves; dining room with natural stone fireplace, polished mantel and side shelf, arched recess and a wealth of exposed ceiling and wall timbers.
Formerly the vicarage to Holy Trinity Church, the house dates from around 1910 and is built of brick with mock half-timbering to the upper elevations beneath a pitched, tiled roof.
At Bournville and Bordesley Green, Hay Mills and Harborne, builders and industrialists recreated the villages of rural England, complete with maypoles and half-timbering, to re-establish a link with a past that had vanished so quickly and so completely.