hamartoma

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hamartoma

[‚ha·mər′tō·mə]
(medicine)
An abnormal condition resulting in the formation of a mass of tissue of disproportionate size and distribution but composed of the normal tissue of the region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Histologic sections showed similar findings to that seen on biopsy, with hamartomatous polyps containing regenerative changes.
On histop athology, the lesions were consistent with hamartomatous polyps with myxoid expansion of the lamina propria, numerous degranulated eosinophils, and occasional mast cells.
Hyperplastic and hamartomatous extratesticular intrascrotal lesions are exceptionally rare and may simulate neoplasia on clinical examination (2).
Hence, a growth consisting of numerous well-differentiated blood vessels ranging in appearance from capillaries to dilated muscular-walled arteries and arterioles embedded in a young cellular connective tissue stroma is considered to be a hamartomatous malformation--not a neoplasm of blood vessels as was once believed.
PJS, a genetic disease, is characterized by multiple pathognomonic hamartomatous polyps throughout the small bowel.
Whether it represents a neoplastic, malformative, or hamartomatous lesion is still the subject of much debate.
Microscopic examination will reveal hamartomatous proliferations of vascular tissue within endothelium-lined spaces.
The gastrointestinal polyps found in CCS are retention-type or hamartomatous in nature and are not neoplastic pathologically (6).
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an autosomal, dominantly inherited disease characterized by hamartomatous polyps of the gastrointestinal tract and pigmented macules of the lips and buccal mucosa.
Originally believed to be a hamartomatous lesion, angiomyolipoma (AML) is currently defined as a benign mesenchymal tumor composed of a variable proportion of adipose tissue, spindle and epithelioid smooth muscle cells, and abnormal thick-walled blood vessels.
3,6,7) Rhabdomyomas of the heart are usually hamartomatous growths, and they have been associated with phakomatoses such as tuberous sclerosis.
Blue nevi are often grouped together with hamartomatous dermal dendritic melanocytic proliferations such as nevus of Ota, nevus of Ito, and Mongolian spot.