Hamiltonian path

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Hamiltonian path

[‚ham·əl′tō·nē·ən ‚path]
(mathematics)
A path along the edges of a graph that traverses every vertex exactly once and terminates at its starting point. Also known as Hamiltonian circuit; Hamiltonian cycle.

Hamiltonian path

References in periodicals archive ?
Then, the Hamilton cycle for m can be obtained in this case as per the following figure (only above possible cases).
As an example, Figure 15 shows a hamilton cycle for m = 3, k = 8, l = 4.
To construct a Hamilton cycle for any m [greater than or equal to] 2, we take m copies of the Hamilton cycle of [P.
If m = 1 and l [greater than or equal to] 1, then the Hamilton cycle is H: [a.
If m = 2 and l = 0, then the Hamilton cycle in this case is [H.
If m = 2 and l [greater than or equal to] 1, then the Hamilton cycle in this case is [H.
Now for any even m and any l, we can construct the Hamilton cycle, starting from [H.
4k+l], from left to right in order, we see that the new Hamilton cycle [H.
These cases are considered in the construction of desired Hamilton cycles in the following.
For the cases n = 10 and n = 11, the Hamilton cycles are shown respectively in the Figure 19 and Figure 20.

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