Hammer-beam roof

Hammer-beam roof

1. A roof without a tie beam at the top of the wall.
2. A roof without a tie beam at the top of the wall. See also: Roof

hammer-beam roof

hammer-beam roof
A roof supported by hammer beams.
References in classic literature ?
The strong, alien voice of the priest vibrated under the hammer-beam roof, and a loneliness unfelt before swamped their hearts, as they searched for places in the unfamiliar Church of England service.
The Town Court is unchanged since it was designed by York architect Robert Trollope in 1655 and the room features a hammer-beam roof with carved masks supporting the various guilds of the town.
Whilst the Tudor State Apartments are magnificent--with the Great Hall's spectacular hammer-beam roof (left) and the Great Watching Chamber's gold-leafed ceiling, and the walls in both decorated with sumptuous sixteenth-century tapestries--they currently give visitors little sense of what it was actually like to be present at Henry VIII's court.
Beneath the central tower a wide staircase takes you to the great hall, soaring three storeys high to the open hammer-beam roof.
Built in 1524, it features double naves separated by pillars, under a fine hammer-beam roof decorated with angels in the southern aisle.
Not just for God's presence, perhaps, but at the hammer-beam roof, restored 20 years ago.
Other papers are devoted to more particular matters -- the hammer-beam roof over Westminster Hall, iron reinforcement in the Louvre, John Smeaton's use of hydraulic cement in the Eddystone lighthouse, and ribbed vaults and squinch arches in cathedrals.
Situated on Liverpool Road, it's a fine 16th-century Tudor building with a spectacular great hall with an intricately carved wooden screen and hammer-beam roof.
It also has the Town Hall in the Market Place, complete with "fine hammer-beam roof, wood panelling and stained glass windows.