Hammurabi


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Hammurabi
BirthplaceBabylon
Known for Code of Hammurabi

Hammurabi

(hämo͝orä`bē), fl. 1792–1750 B.C., king of BabyloniaBabylonia
, ancient empire of Mesopotamia. The name is sometimes given to the whole civilization of S Mesopotamia, including the states established by the city rulers of Lagash, Akkad (or Agade), Uruk, and Ur in the 3d millennium B.C.
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. He founded an empire that was eventually destroyed by raids from Asia Minor. Hammurabi may have begun building the tower of Babel (Gen. 11.4), which can now be identified with the temple-tower in Babylon called Etemenanki. His code of laws is one of the greatest of ancient codes. It is carved on a diorite column, in 3,600 lines of cuneiform; it was found (1902) at Susa and is now at Paris. The code, which addresses such issues as business and family relations, labor, private property, and personal injuries, is generally humanitarian. One severe feature, however, is the retributive nature of the punishment, which follows "an eye for an eye" literally. Much of the code is drawn from earlier Sumerian and Semitic laws, which seem to provide the basis for its harshly punitive nature.

Hammurabi

 

King of Babylonia (1792–1750 B.C.). The ascendancy of Babylonia is associated with his name.

An Amorite in origin, Hammurabi was a skillful politician and military leader. Within 35 years he succeeded, by military force and diplomacy, in bringing Assyria and the southern and middle regions of Mesopotamia under Babylonian Tule. His codification of the law, known as the Code of Hammurabi, reflected various significant developments under his reign—specifically, the expansion of commodity-money relations, the growth of private slaveholding, the increasing centralization of the state, and the consolidation of the king’s power.

Hammurabi

Babylonian king (c. 1800 B.C.); established first systematic legal code. [Classical Hist.: EB, 8: 598–599]

Hammurabi

, Hammurapi
?18th century bc, king of Babylonia; promulgator of one of the earliest known codes of law
References in periodicals archive ?
Sections 168-69 of Codex Hammurabi set forth important rules that were intended on the one hand to continue the customary law in this matter, and on the other hand, to execute a significant reform.
The inclusion of Old Babylonian sources is, furthermore, highly selective, for it privileges the reigns of Hammurabi and his successor Samsuiluna.
1) The Hammurabi Code is more famous for law 196 which has been summarized as an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth.
Indeed, it would seem that the Torah laws regarding slavery were given in protest not only against Egypt, but also against the Code of Hammurabi.
It appears regularly in first- and second-millennium royal inscriptions, including The Laws of Hammurabi, where the king is the zaninum na'dum sa ekur "pious provider for the Ekur-temple" (i 60-62).
Skin in the game started with Hammurabi, led later on to eye-for-eye, and led to the Golden Rule.
Abortion was outlawed by the Code of Hammurabi, proscribed in the Hippocratic Oath, and subject to the criminal law of every one of the United States within Obama's lifetime.
The first known code was that of Hammurabi (circa 1772 BCE), who established a performance-based code with strict penalties for noncompliance (Harper 1904).
Hammurabi outlined numerous specific prescriptions to set a "just" or "fair" price.
However, any well-trained economist would already be quite familiar with the history of economic thought: Any text worth its weight in greenbacks on this topic stretches back to Aristotle, and adventurous tomes would possibly include the Code of Hammurabi (wherein one will find strict rules on the allocation of inheritances--allocations that surprisingly align with optimal outcomes of multiplayer noncooperative game theory).
Manoj Kumar of Hammurabi Solomon Law Firm pointed out many flaws in the bill - even in the definition of public services.
The five historical documents included are the Code of Hammurabi (ca.