Wade Hampton

(redirected from Hampton, Wade)

Hampton, Wade,

c.1752–1835, American planter and soldier, b. Halifax co., Va. He served in the American Revolution and took part in South Carolina politics, opposing the ratification of the U.S. Constitution and serving as a U.S. Representative (1795–97, 1803–5). He developed large cotton plantations in South Carolina before 1800, held sugar plantations in Mississippi after 1811, and was reputed to be the wealthiest planter of his day in America. A major general in the War of 1812, Hampton commanded a force that was to march from N New York to the St. Lawrence River and then, after effecting a union with Gen. James Wilkinson's army, move against Montreal. He was defeated by a smaller British force in the battle of ChateaugayChateaugay
, river, c.50 mi (80 km) long, rising in Chateaugay Lake in the Adirondacks, NE N.Y., and flowing through Quebec to empty into the St. Lawrence 10 mi (16 km) below Montreal, opposite the mouth of the Ottawa River.
..... Click the link for more information.
; and, blamed by Wilkinson for the failure of the campaign, he resigned his command. Wade Hampton (1818–1902) was his grandson.

Hampton, Wade,

1818–1902, Confederate general in the American Civil War, b. Charleston, S.C.; grandson of Wade Hampton (c.1752–1835). Hampton, a wealthy planter, served (1852–61) in the South Carolina legislature. In the Civil War he raised Hampton's Legion, which he led at the first battle of Bull Run. He commanded an infantry brigade in the Peninsular campaign, being made a brigadier general in May, 1862, but in July was given a brigade in the cavalry. He was active in most of Jeb Stuart's operations (1862–64) and upon Stuart's death in 1864 succeeded to the command of the cavalry corps. He took part in the fighting around Richmond and Petersburg and later with part of his force was engaged in covering Joseph E. Johnston's army until the surrender to General Sherman in Apr., 1865. He had been promoted lieutenant general in Feb., 1865. In the election of 1876, the Democrats of South Carolina were led to victory by Hampton, their candidate for governor. Daniel H. Chamberlain, the carpetbagger incumbent, disputed the result, but when federal troops were withdrawn (Apr., 1877), he had no support. More for this political triumph, which restored home rule, than for his military prowess Hampton is considered a state hero. He was reelected as governor in 1878 and in 1879 became a U.S. Senator. Hampton remained the dominant figure in South Carolina politics until 1890, when Benjamin TillmanTillman, Benjamin Ryan,
1847–1918, U.S. Senator from South Carolina (1895–1918), b. Edgefield co., S.C. A farmer, he became the leader of the backcountry whites in South Carolina and fostered their discontent with the ruling tidewater aristocracy.
..... Click the link for more information.
 led a successful revolt against Hampton's rule, and Hampton lost his Senate seat. He was (1893–99) commissioner of Pacific railroads.

Bibliography

See E. L. Wells, Hampton and His Cavalry (1899) and Hampton and Reconstruction (1907); A. B. Williams, Hampton and His Red Shirts (1935, repr. 1970); M. W. Wellman, Giant in Gray (1949); H. M. Jarrell, Wade Hampton and the Negro (1949, repr. 1969).

Hampton, Wade

(1751–1835) soldier, politician; born in Halifax County, Va. He fought in the American Revolution and afterwards served two terms in Congress. Reentering the army in 1808, Hampton received a share of blame for the failed U.S. expedition to Montreal (1813) during the War of 1812. At one time he was said to be the wealthiest plantation owner in the U.S.A.

Hampton, Wade

(1818–1902) Confederate soldier; born in Charleston, S.C. The son and grandson of wealthy planters, he raised and commanded "Hampton's Legion" and succeeded J. E. B. Stuart as commander of Confederate cavalry in 1864. Hampton was a postwar governor (1876–79) then U.S. senator (1879–91) from South Carolina.