Hans Gross


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Gross, Hans

 

Born Dec. 16, 1847, in Graz; died there Dec. 9, 1915. Austrian criminologist.

Gross was a professor of criminal law at the University of Czernowitz from 1897 to 1902; he held the same position at the University of Prague from 1902 to 1905 and, beginning in 1905, at the University of Graz. He was one of the founders of criminology and one of the fathers of criminal psychology; his Criminal Psychology (1898) was the first major work on the subject. He established the world’s first museum of criminology at Graz. His chief work was the Manual for Investigators as a System of Criminal Law (1893; Russian translations, 1895–96, 1908, 1930). Gross founded the journal Archiv für Kriminalanthropologie und Kriminalistik (Archives for Criminal Anthropology and Criminal Law); from 1898 to 1915 he was its editor in chief. He was the author of works that demonstrated the importance of applying the data of the natural and exact sciences to the problems of crime detection and criminal identification.

References in periodicals archive ?
works by Hans Gross, Christopher Black, and Christopher Johns) and seems unaware of the discussion about the Enlightenment in the Anglophone world (works by Jonathan Israel and John Robertson).
Shaowu Zhang, Chief Investigator of The Vision Centre in Australia and Professor Hans Gross and Professor Juergen Tautz of Wurzburg University in Germany, have revealed that they carried out an exquisitely designed experiment that showed that bees could discriminate between patterns containing two and three dots, without having to count the dots.
In this welcome monograph, however, Hans Gross examines a city less familiar to English-speaking readers: eighteenth-century Rome, the city, as he puts it, of the "ancien regime.