Hans Memling

(redirected from Hans Memlinc)

Memling, Hans

 

Born circa 1440, in Seligenstadt, Hesse; died Aug. 11, 1494, in Bruges. Flemish painter.

Memling may have studied with Rogier van der Weyden. From 1465 he worked in Bruges. His works are distinguished by their serenity and clear colors. The religious scenes are reminis-cent of genre paintings of the burghers’ milieu (for example, the Chatsworth Triptych showing the Virgin and Child with the saints and donors [those who commissioned the painting], 1468, the National Gallery in London; and the panels for the St. Ursula shrine, 1489, Memling Museum, Bruges). However, in his works Memling somewhat rigidified the techniques of old Netherlandish painting. This dogmatic approach is particularly evi-dent in The Last Judgment, in which the artist achieved some monumentally of image (c. 1473, altar of the Church of the Virgin Mary, Gdansk). An especially noteworthy work is Bathsheba, a life-sized female nude, a rare subject in Flemish painting (c. 1485, Museum of Baden-Wiirtemberg, Stuttgart). In Memling’s portraits, most of which depict his patrons, the humanistic elements of his art are most clearly revealed.

REFERENCES

Nikulin, N. N. “Altar’ Gansa MemlingaStrashnyisud. “Iskusstvo, 1960, no. 12, pp. 62-69.
Friedlander, M. J. The Early Netherlandish Painting [vol. 6, part 1:“Hans Memling”]. Leiden-Brussels, 1971. (With bibliography; translated from German.)
McFarlaine, K. B. Hans Memling. Oxford, 1971.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ghost of Hans Memlinc, who died there five hundred years ago this month, would have no difficulty in finding its way around the entranced and entrancing Belgian city.
As if in approbation, the angels of Stephan Lochner's sweet peripheries fly, blue-night-shirted for heaven, into the paintings of Hans Memlinc, such as his Saint Michael in the Wallace Collection in London: for all his sword, the most pacific St.
The two pictures ambitiously attributed to Hans Memlinc, The Annunciation and The Rest on the Flight to Egypt, are not characteristic of that artist.