Hansen's disease


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Hansen's disease:

see leprosyleprosy
or Hansen's disease
, chronic, mildly infectious malady capable of producing, when untreated, various deformities and disfigurements. It is caused by the rod-shaped bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, first described by G.
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.

Hansen's disease

[′han·sənz di‚zēz]
(medicine)
An infectious disease of humans thought to be caused by Mycobacterium leprae ; common manifestations are cutaneous and neural lesions. Also known as leprosy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Discharged cases of Hansen's Disease whose responsibility?
Tinea barbae: in released from treatment (RFT) Hansen's disease patient.
Serious research into Hansen's disease began in the late nineteenth century as a result of the large-scale leprosy epidemic in Europe, particularly Norway, when about 3,000 cases were reported.
Fuddy served as the mayor of Kalawao County on Molokai--where there is still a small population living at the site of the original colony for people with Hansen's disease.
But Hawaiian leaders sent victims of Hansen's disease here because of its Alcatraz-like inaccessibility, not its beauty.
1) Unfortunately it appears that the author misinterpreted a statement concerning leprosy made by Sharon Lerner in a 2003 issue of The New York Times, which states: "While there were some 900 recorded cases in the United States 40 years ago, today more than 7,000 people have leprosy, or Hansen's disease, as it is now called.
Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, is caused by a germ, or bacteria.
Leprosy, also called Hansen's disease, in humans in the U.
In 2010, there were 26 new cases of Hansen's Disease (also known as leprosy) in Texas.
What is leprosy Leprosy is a medical condition, also known as Hansen's Disease, after Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian doctor who was the first to view the leprosy microbe under a microscope in 1873.
When Hansen's disease was brought to the islands in the early 19th century, it spread like a plague.
Nobuo Kuroki, head of the society's subcommittee on Hansen's disease, said he believes the survey will help provide a clearer picture of how patients suffered under the state's seclusion policy.