Pinyin

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Pinyin

(pĭn`yĭn`) [Chin. Hanyu pinyin = Chinese phonetic alphabet], system of romanization of Chinese written characters, approved in 1958 by the government of the People's Republic of China and officially adopted by it in 1979. Developed in the 1950s by a committee headed by Zhou Youguang, it was based on several earlier romanization systems, and replaced that those and the more complex Wade-Giles system (1859; modified 1912), among others. The reasons for adopting Pinyin included promoting a national language, establishing a means for writing non-Chinese (minority) languages in China, and encouraging foreigners to learn Chinese. Pinyin, which became more widely used in the West in the 1980s, is not used officially in Taiwan.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 percent of American high schools teaching Chinese were using Hanyu pinyin, the examinations were not designed to include any questions using zhuyin fuhao, or phonetic symbols.
Thus schools advocating simplified characters and Hanyu pinyin decided to organize a separate group.
A compromise solution, favored by an increasing number of schools, is to teach both simplified and traditional characters and both Hanyu pinyin and phonetic symbols.
When schools teaching simplified characters and Hanyu pinyin entered the picture and CSAUS was organized, one of the first concerns was to find suitable instructional materials for these classes.
An unresolved issue that had been thrust to the fore since the 1970s was whether to teach simplified characters and Hanyu pinyin, traditional characters and phonetic symbols, or both in the Chinese schools.
for two decades, as well as the dominance of the anti-PRC partisans in the Chinese American community the simplified characters and Hanyu pinyin promulgated in the PRC during the 1950s were excluded from the community, and practically all Chinese schools used only traditional characters and phonetic symbols.
And although there is much disparagement of simplified characters and Hanyu pinyin among defenders of Chinese traditional values, it is highly unlikely that the PRC will jettison these products of the language reform that have been in use for four decades.
Political changes in East Asia during the past half-century are reflected in two separate systems of Chinese writing in the various schools: traditional characters with zhuyin fuhao as pronunciation aids, and simplified characters with Hanyu pinyin as pronunciation aids.
Individuals' names other than pinyin translations are given with surname last, per Western practice, but when only the Chinese characters are known, the name is transliterated using Hanyu pinyin with the surname first, as in Chinese practice.
The resulting Hanyu pinyin system was officially promulgated in 1958.
7% Number of teachers 34 13 47 Type of romanization used: Hanyu pinyin 76.