Happiness


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Happiness

 

the human spirit’s consciousness of that state of being which corresponds to the greatest inner satisfaction with the conditions of one’s existence, to a full and meaningful life, and to the realization of one’s life purpose. Happiness is the emotionally sensed form of the ideal. The concept of happiness does not simply refer to a specific objective or subjective human condition, but it expresses an idea of what human life should be like and of what exactly constitutes human bliss. Thus happiness is a normative and value-bound concept. What is deemed to constitute happiness depends on how the purpose and meaning of human life are defined.

The concept of happiness has a historical and class basis. In the history of moral consciousness, happiness has been considered an innate human right; but in practice, in a society of class antagonisms, as F. Engels pointed out, the oppressed classes’ striving toward happiness has always been ruthlessly and “lawfully” sacrificed to the ruling classes’ identical striving.

In criticizing the bourgeois-individualistic interpretation of happiness, the founders of Marxism-Leninism pointed out that man’s striving exclusively toward a personal happiness, divorced from social aims, degenerates into egoism, which tramples upon the interests of others and morally cripples the human personality. As Marx wrote, “If one wishes to be an animal, one may, of course, turn one’s back on the sufferings of humanity and worry about one’s own skin” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 31, p. 454). Marx likewise rejected the leveling concepts of “barracks communism”—concepts which he described as “a return to the unnatural simplicity of man when he is poor and has no wants” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Iz rannikh proizvedenii, 1956, p. 587).

In characterizing his own personal understanding of happiness, Marx stated he saw happiness in struggle (K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 31, p. 492). This concept, which is contrary to any philistine notion of happiness, does not represent some idyllic state of satisfaction with an existing situation; rather, it is the constant striving for a better future and the overcoming of obstacles on the way thereto; it is not the attainment of one’s own well-being but the full development and use of one’s abilities in conscious activity subordinate to the attainment of common goals. It is through conscientious service to people and through a revolutionary struggle to transform society, to realize the ideals of communism, and to achieve a better future for all humanity that man imbues his life with that higher meaning and is granted that profound satisfaction which he perceives as happiness.

Happiness

(dreams)
If you are currently experiencing sadness this dream may be an attempt to compensate and to comfort you. Traditionally this may be called a dream of the contrary. Extreme happiness in a dream calls for an evaluation of daily reality in an attempt to identify those things that are difficult and painful, (i. e., things that make you feel the opposite of happy). Dreaming of happy children is said to be a good omen probably because children represent endless possibilities and opportunities for growth and development.
References in classic literature ?
So much does friendship triumph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings vanish at the meeting not only of real friends, but of the most distant acquaintances, and substitutes happiness in their room.
Though with your usual anxiety for our happiness," said Elinor, "you have been obviating every impediment to the present scheme which occurred to you, there is still one objection which, in my opinion, cannot be so easily removed.
Surely they can spare a little of it, just one day's sight of it, to a less happy world,--a world long since married and done for, and with little happiness in it save the spectacle of other people's happiness.
They must have reflected, that in all great changes of established governments, forms ought to give way to substance; that a rigid adherence in such cases to the former, would render nominal and nugatory the transcendent and precious right of the people to "abolish or alter their governments as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness,"[2] since it is impossible for the people spontaneously and universally to move in concert towards their object; and it is therefore essential that such changes be instituted by some INFORMAL AND UNAUTHORIZED PROPOSITIONS, made by some patriotic and respectable citizen or number of citizens.
Dantes himself was simply, but becomingly, clad in the dress peculiar to the merchant service -- a costume somewhat between a military and a civil garb; and with his fine countenance, radiant with joy and happiness, a more perfect specimen of manly beauty could scarcely be imagined.
Without thinking highly either of men or matrimony, marriage had always been her object; it was the only provision for well-educated young women of small fortune, and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest preservative from want.
Once it had, by an opening undesigned and unmerited, led him into the way of happiness.
I SAW thee on thy bridal day - When a burning blush came o'er thee, Though happiness around thee lay, The world all love before thee:
It had cost her, she said, untold difficulty to send these few things to her daughter; she entreated her not to think her hard if, henceforth, she were forced to abandon her to want; she feared she could never again assist her; but she blessed her and prayed for her happiness in this fatal marriage, if, indeed, she persisted in making it, assuring her that she should never cease to think of her darling child.
Let us therefore be well assured, that every one enjoys as much happiness as he possesses virtue and wisdom, and acts according to their dictates; since for this we have the example of GOD Himself, WHO IS COMPLETELY HAPPY, NOT FROM ANY EXTERNAL GOOD; BUT IN HlMSELF, AND BECAUSE SUCH IS HIS NATURE.
Anna Pavlovna threatened him on behalf of "our dear Vyazmitinov," and in her eyes, which, for an instant, glanced at Pierre, Prince Vasili read a congratulation on his future son-in-law and on his daughter's happiness.
At the sound of her voice the old man looked up, and when he saw who it was confronting him he, too, cried out in relief and happiness.