haptic

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Related to Haptic device: Haptic interface

haptic

Dealing with the sense of touch. See haptic interface, haptic VR and Taptic Engine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mechdyne Corporation, an advanced data visualization solutions integrator and maker of Conduit[TM] for V5, and Haption, a leading maker of haptic devices and full-body motion capture software, demonstrated this ground-breaking capability on a 3D ROVR[TM] display with motion tracking at Dassault's Customer Conference November 9-10, in Orlando, Florida.
In order to obtain a virtual reality model of the surgery room as well as the patient's anatomy, one or more haptic devices must be used.
Some simulation units are equipped with haptic devices (Figure 6).
They used a PUMA 560 robot (Staubli Unimation, Inc, Duncan, South Carolina, no longer in existence) as a haptic device and visual feedback from an LCD (liquid crystal display) as shown in Figure 5 [23].
Though a recent GHOST version allows assignation of simple dynamic properties to the virtual environment, PHANToM uses simple PID-based cartesian stiffness control, which further limits the scope of this haptic device for dynamic-based (second order deformable) virtual environments.
If, for example, the driver changes lanes without using the turn signal, a visual cue is displayed and a haptic device in the driver's seat is activated.
The IKD requires the development of a prototype Haptic device (H3DI--Haptic 3D Interface) and certain applications for educational purposes.
Lastly, Windows NT is linked to the PHANTOM haptic device.
A researcher also can slip on a so-called haptic device, in this case a glove with which one person can "touch" the casing at different locations and feel its vibrations.
Through computer modeling, the simulation emulates various lesion and skin thicknesses, and it includes a haptic device that provides the tactile sensation of sampling the skin with a punch biopsy.
The study presented here explored the efficacy of a haptic device and a computer simulation to teach students with visual impairments about heat and pressure concepts associated with particle movement.
Recent advances in fluid-powered medical devices are described, including a needle steering robot for neurosurgery and a haptic device for hemiplegia rehabilitation.