hard paste porcelain

hard paste porcelain

[′härd ‚pāst ′pȯrs·lən]
(materials)
References in periodicals archive ?
Germany's Meissen was the first European factory to discover the secret of how to produce fine hard paste porcelain - previously closely guarded by the Chinese - in the middle of the 18th century.
The secret of hard paste porcelain, previously the exclusive knowledge of the Chinese and Japanese exporters, was actually discovered under the commission of Augustus the Strong, in the city of Dresden.
Soft paste porcelain, which does not have the durability and translucency found in hard paste porcelain was in popular use in Europe prior to their discovery of hard paste porcelain.
True, hard paste porcelain was also made in 18th century Italy, principally at the Florentine factory of Doccia and the Venetian works of Vezzi and Cozzi.
Johann Friedrich Bottger (1682-1719) initially discovered how to make a red stoneware and subsequently created the first white hard paste porcelain at Meissen, was quick to exploit these new materials for figurative work.
The line uses hard paste porcelain, a material that transfers among the freezer, fridge, oven and microwave.
It was a myth, of course, but having failed to deliver the gold, Bottger's chance discovery of hard paste porcelain in about 1708 was the next best thing.
However, if genuine, you have a fabulous example of the output from the famous Meissen factory of Saxony after alchemist Johann Bottger discovered the secret of hard paste porcelain in the 1700s.
Traditionally, hard paste porcelain clay has a fine particle size and has the ability to become very hard and glass-like.
Numerous Berlin factories sprang up in and around this great city after E W von Tschirnhausen and Johann Friedrich B'ttger eventually produced a successful hard paste porcelain.
The production of fine ceramic plaques goes hand in hand with the perfection of fine soft and hard paste porcelain bodies.