Hardenability of Steel

Hardenability of Steel

 

the ability of steel to acquire a high degree of hardness (a martensite structure) as a result of the hardening process. Hardenability is determined mainly by the quantity of carbon in the steel. For example, if the carbon content is increased from 0.3 to 0.7 percent, the Rockwell C hardness of a carbon steel increases from 30 to 65 (a further increase of carbon content does not produce an increase in hardness). At carbon contents of less than 0.4 percent, the hardenability of steel can be increased by alloying with nickel, manganese, chromium, or silicon. Hardenability must be distinguished from hardening depth, which denotes the depth of martensite formation in steel structure upon hardening.

References in periodicals archive ?
He applies these concepts to his descriptions of steel and the iron-carbon phase diagram, the various microstructures of room-temperature steel, mechanical properties (including the tensile test, the hardness test, the notched impact test, fatigue failure and residual stresses), the low-alloy American Iron and Steel Institute steels, diffusion as a mechanism for atom migration, control of grain size, hardenability of steel, tempering, austenization, quenching, stainless steels, tool steels, solidification, cast irons, and surface hardening treatments of steels.
Silicomanganese is an important deoxidizer, desulphurizer and alloying element that increases the tensile strength, toughness, stiffness, wear resistance and hardenability of steel, helping to improve the safety and effectiveness of the end product.